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Topic: How DO YOU interpret a score?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    How DO YOU interpret a score?

    Aside from all the technical. How do you interpret a score? I\'ve heard some awesome programming of the Great Masters music using the PC and GPO. I\'ve read many post on the uses of controls, but how DO YOU interpret the score? What’s there that gives you the clues you need aside from dynamic markings and others. How do you know that is what the composer wanted and not some editor along the way? No no no...forget the books for now. What is it that stirs inside of you?

  2. #2
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    Re: How do you interpret a score?

    I study scores along with various recordings to see how others have interpreted it. You will find that every recording has a different interpretation.

    Sometimes I like to just take a score I\'ve never heard and just do my own thing with it.

  3. #3

    Re: How do you interpret a score?

    1) Style period. Just knowing a piece is from the Baroque era tells you a LOT about it.
    2) Who the composer is.
    3) Hopefully, the markings DO give a lot away.
    4) Recordings--always use more than one. If you only listen to one recording, even if it\'s a pro, they may have not have been too detailed in studying or applying the composer\'s intent. I have an odd habit of making CDs with the same piece recorded by different people. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
    5) In the end, I can and sometimes do overrule any or all of the above, but not until I know why it was intended a certain way. Your ears have to win out though.
    Mark

  4. #4

    Re: How do you interpret a score?

    I think the whole point of GPO... do it YOUR OWN WAY...

  5. #5
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: How do you interpret a score?

    [ QUOTE ]
    Sometimes I like to just take a score I\'ve never heard and just do my own thing with it.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    This is interesting. How do you know then, what to do with it musically? Is it style,time period, or the composer that gives you the clue(s)?

  6. #6

    Re: How do you interpret a score?

    We learn interpretation mostly by imitation. Assuming that you have a basic grasp of reading music and sight singing, there are a lot of things you can do to help this along. After over forty-five years of trying to teach interpretation to struggling classical guitar students. Here is an outline of what I might tell one of them if they were trying to grasp good interpretation of music using GPO. Don’t forget, it is a good idea to learn as much about the music of the period in history when a piece was written, culture of the times, and composer as you can. It doesn’t hurt to read books on the subject either.

    <ul type=\"square\">[*]Listen to as much great music as you can, and make note of what music you like.[*]When you find a piece you like, listen to as many performances of it by different conductors or soloists as you can. At first, try short pieces with small groups such as chamber groups.[*]Buy or download the score. Read the score while listening to the music. Make notes on the score of what you like and dislike in each version.[*]Sing! Oh, you think your voice was dug out of a gravel pit; to bad, sing anyway. Try singing passages of the melody, counter melodies, harmonies and bass lines, all while reading the score. Then try them without listening to the music. See if you can sing each part with the dynamics, phrasing, articulations etc. that you like in the original recording. If the string section has a lyrical line that you like, pretend you are the violins, (remember, now this is pretend, you can be one or the whole section if you want. As the section swells, lean in, for this is what you’ll be doing when using the mod wheel with GPO.[*]Learn that piece inside and out. Be able to sing any part and see if you can hear it in you minds ear. Now copy the track into your sequencer. Load you GPO orchestra into it also.[*]Take a short section of the piece, and learn one part on the keyboard. Just get the notes and rhythms down.[*]Listen to that section again, singing that part out loud, and start practicing the use of your mod wheel to emulate the feeling that the musicians are playing. Try and bring that essence from deep within your being, from a place beneath your gut that is known as your chi. For a moment, that music is you and you are that music. When you think you have got a close representation of what you hear, lay the track down.[*]Now do another part in the same section, in the same way. Always singing. Always feeling. Always remembering you’re only a part of the whole, and keeping note how you are relating to the other instruments or sections.[*]Once all the parts are recorded, try blending them with redrawing of your mod wheel curves (sometimes we can get a little bit carried away with our chi). Save the old before trying to make it better. Sometimes we only make it worse.[/list]

    Once you have done this several times, you will be able to start looking at scores and begin to hear deeper between the notes. It’s easy to say, “Do one’s own thing, it’s a lot harder to know what one’s own thing is. By carefully examining the work of others, you will be more likely to find what touches your soul and begin to share it with the world.

    Interpretation, like all parts of good musicianship takes time. I can’t emphasize too much, listening, singing and feeling.

    Good luck

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