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Topic: OT: Biomusicology

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  1. #1

    OT: Biomusicology

    I\'m not quite sure what to say about this, but it makes me feel great and I hope you enjoy it too...

    http://www.musicsolutions.ca/morgenson.html

    Thanks, Gary, for all your work and love. And bless all of us who keep trying through music, despite ourselves and our species, to make harmony in this world.

    PC

  2. #2

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Astonishing.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Discoveries in France and Slovenia suggest that musical instruments may date back as far as 53,000 years. The instruments discovered are flutes carved of animal bone and are so sophisticated in their design as to suggest that humans had already been fashioning musical instruments for hundreds of thousands of years.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Music is the great unifier. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] And WE know it! muhaha! :: echo evil laughter ::

    - Junker

  3. #3
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    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Croz,

    Interesting article.

    It seems natural that early man made music to emulate the sounds of birds and animals. A number of years ago I spent some time with Paul Winter who recorded with the sounds humback whales and other animals I recall him talking about whale songs being structured in orderly phrases and learned by the entire pod.

    Music is deeply imbedded into who and what we are. Some scientists say there is a biological and genetic basis for music. Perhaps some of us were just born to make music.

    Someone has gone through the trouble of converting DNA code into MIDI sequences. http://www.toshima.ne.jp/~edogiku/ Anyone care to make a GPO demo of DNA music?

    Richard Krull, one of our Northern Sounds members (and GOS beta guy) has done some fascinating work with writing music based on the Human Genome. His work was been written about in Science Magazine and the Chicago Tribune. Perhaps he can tell us more about biomusicality.

    Gary Garritan

  4. #4

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Hi Gary!

    Yes, I made a work in colaboration with Aurora (she is biologist in a big hospital here in Madrid). She had the idea, looking at the ADN code, to translate in a manner to musical language. She called me to start working in order to compose 10 tunes based on some Human Genome material.
    So the first thing was to find realtionship between genetic code and musical language. The genetic code is based on a structure with 4 basic components A, T, G, and C.
    Next step was looking the dimension of a particular gen and finding repetitive sequence inside or whatever that could attract our attention.
    Another parameter was the gen itself and what it cause in the body in order to find an inspiration to begin the composition/translation.
    The basis of translation was to make a correspondance from ATGC to musical language. Her we have various possibilities like notes, harmonies, rhythm, pitched and no pitched sounds, etc... This sounding bacground is sounding always in the songs more or less evidently.
    I told to my compagnion/biologist about my thoughts of life: human being is not a body. Body is what we have to care in our existence in order to communicate all around for survive purpose. It is what I think for a long time ago. So I told her that I could´nt compose music only like a robotic option. I have to pay atention on the human genome, Ok! but something has to be recreated in order to reproduce the effect of a living body. When a body is completely quiet (dead) is has no more life (soul), I mean human life. He still have some lifes with the activity of bacteries, etc... but no human life: spirit is gone away out of the body. Spirit is completely free in essence. Where can be imaged the Spirit in music: first in the Player(s) but also in the Composer and finally in the audience. It is well know that a particular piano sound different depending on who is playing it!
    And in a composition, where is the Spirit? That remind me a phrase said by Gustav Mahler (if I remember well), something like this: \"All is in the music sheet, except the essential\".
    So I had to encounter a sort of freedom in this particular work: The Melody!
    Aurora we have the background with some \"obligati\" result of translation of ATGC to music language (body) but as is it is dead or not yet animated. Let´s put some free melodies, harmonies and whatever we want (Spirit). This is like in life: Somebody is thirsty and he decide to drink water, and another wine, another nothing, another much more water then the first one. Why? There are singing different melodies. (I suppose it is not that simple but to get the idea...)
    So basically this work has been made in a semblence to what I consider the Human to be. The resulting material is an easy listening NewAge-like music focused into robotic dictations (DNA).

    Sorry for my bad english, I just intend to resume what was done here.

  5. #5

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Really cool article, thanks for posting this - I\'m printing the txt now...

  6. #6

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    [ QUOTE ]
    \"..who recorded with the sounds humback whales and other animals I recall him talking about whale songs being structured in orderly phrases and learned by the entire pod..\"
    Gary Garritan

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I saw a documentery about wales. They said that when wales from .. uh.. north atlantic came down to the ones in australia, the wales from far away attracted the females because of their new tunes.

    To simplify:
    When a wale with a different melody came to a number of wales, the females choosed him to multiply with.
    Heh.. its the same with us humans [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    I wonder if they have a young male band named Blue (Whale) [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]

  8. #8

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Richard,

    Your DNA music track sounds really cool, do you have a demo you could post?

  9. #9
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    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Richard,

    Really fascinating! Thanks for visiting us.
    I remember reading about your work in Science Magazine which was very interesting. How do you translate DNA code into musical language? It must have been a difficult process. I am wondering what type of modality that would be and what it would sound like. Is it a whole new genre of music?

    Gary Garritan

  10. #10

    Re: OT: Biomusicology

    Alan, here is the first track.
    It has been made from all the possible combinations of the ATGC structure and it´s called Basic Component Alpha:
    www.rd-krull.com/BCA.mp3

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