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Topic: Balletto dell'Asino

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  1. #11
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Nov 2004
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    Shelton, Washington State
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    3,350

    Re: Balletto dell'Asino

    Hello Jos,

    It was quite nice listening to your completed Balletto dell’Asino. It does sound very real like a recorded orchestral work. Hopefully, the only thing better will be hearing it performed live in attendance.

    I remember when I first started using VIs in 2004 the VSL library was the pinnacle of quality but the entry was two to three thousand dollars. My poor man’s solution for most orchestral sounds was to combine GPO and IK Multimedia’s Miroslav Philharmonic. A dryly recorded library that required modulation, attack and reverb and a library that was sampled on an actual stage with baked in acoustics and emotively performed notes.

    Donkeys here in the timberlands were steam powered contraptions that yarded in the logs to the landing.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZI2WAPZzU2I


    Again, great work!




    Phil

  2. #12

    Re: Balletto dell'Asino

    Hi Phil,

    Thanks for your comment and the listen.

    The VSL libraries that I use were recorded as dry as possible in a "silent" studio. That means that there isn't any acoustic at all (reflections and reverberation). That's why I have to work for weeks with the samples/instruments to place them on the right spot and to create a lively and realistic ambience. Instruments come to life when played in a good listening environment.
    The present day VSL Synchron libraries are recorded in the Synchron Studios (Vienna) with a fixed seat positions and acoustic ambience, which implies that you can't alter the position and the reverb sound or reflections. I have definitely chosen not to use them and to work my way, with greater liberty and creativity to create the ambience a certain genre or style needs (according to my experience and taste). All the rest is merely technical bla-bla (mastering, limiting, pre- and post-balances...) which classical music often doesn't even require. A good orchestral balance and the precise choice of articulations/samples is ways more important.

    Jos
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

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