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Topic: The Nature of Illusion

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  1. #1

    The Nature of Illusion

    A MOR easy listening piece, with a subtle jazz feel.

    This piece was like creating a sculpture. I carved out parts, and as I added more parts, I went back and re-defined previously sections.. The melodic tracks were improved, with some editing, cutting/pasting. As I kept carving out the un-needed parts, it became more obvious of what was supposed to happen.

    I've discovered I use a creatiive/subjective and an analytical/objective mode. Usually in creative mode. I just play, I might listen and re-do if I think it needs to be more focused. But I don't get hung up on timing mistakes, or messy playing (hitting 2 notes at once). I usually record several passes. Then I wait another day, then listen, analyze.

    I've found I do come up with some good ideas, but they don't come out in a linear order. I might make a part, decide it's garbage and MUTE it. After I've created some more parts, I UNMUTE the bad track, and realize it sounds like I was responding to parts I recorded later.

    And believe me I also come up with a fair amount of bad ideas too. I see it seems to take some time for me to get 'accustomed' to parts, which at first sounded bad.. Other times, I create something I think is great, and realize the next day, although it might be bad or good; it doesn't 'fit' with the other parts.

    I sometimes get anxious as I create, thinking it's not up to par.. Then I realize I need to have more confidence in my ability to get it right.. (usually takes some time). I'm much more 'picky' about what passes now, then when I was younger.


    If anyone has a problem playing the link, please let me know. I'm having problems with Safari. You can download and listen. I'll see
    if I can fix it.

    The Nature of Illusion -https://drive.google.com/file/d/1p8n...ew?usp=sharing


    The Nature of Illusion Score -https://drive.google.com/file/d/13ti...ew?usp=sharing

  2. #2
    Senior Member tedvanya's Avatar
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    Jun 2009
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    Re: The Nature of Illusion

    While jazz, even subtle jazz leave me behind, I do enjoy the inventiveness and brilliance of your work, always professionally done. This time, your description how your process of creating is going, all of us can learn and appreciate your methods. Thanks,

    Ted

  3. #3

    Re: The Nature of Illusion

    Hi Mark,

    Well, that was very enjoyable indeed!

    You most certainly are developing your skills of
    composing and the ways for expressing yourself.

    This piece sounds much clearer and more present
    than some of your other pieces, which had elements
    that sounded far off and vague.

    Thanks for posting.


    ~ Yudit ~

  4. #4
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Nov 2004
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    Shelton, Washington State
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    3,325

    Re: The Nature of Illusion

    Hello Mark,

    I agree with Yudit that this music is more unified in musical thought than some of your previous work. As always, the execution is impeccable.

    Yes, it’s pretty MOR/light jazz but you provide ones journey with twists and turns that are intriguing and fun until returning to it’s natural conclusion.




    Phil

  5. #5

    THANX for The observation about being more focused

    Thanks for the comments, I appreciate them.. In ways, I realized this piece came out better than others. Lately I have been starting my songs, with carefully worked out chord progressions. making them move forward, get complex, busier, simpler. - the pacing of the changes. After I have worked out a decent (to me) progression. I lay down a block chord progression (full legato between changes). Then I begin adding parts, usually melody jams. I lay down a bunch of them, muting out, as I create a few more.

    I then listen to the several takes, analyze, keep good parts, realize what could be the main melody, then build other tracks to support that.

    For the majority of my life, I supported myself playing music. For the last 20 years, I got a gig as a doorman, at a club, I made enough money, I slacked down on looking for music jobs. I also was more interested in 'exploring' new methods. For a while, rebelling against most of previous music.. I stopped caring about tight, predictive chord progressions, melodies et. I took to writing what I might call 'wallpaper music', or musical journeys. I wasn't concerted about concise melodies, repeating structures. This music had a kind of 'free feel' The listener wasn't forced, encouraged to pay attention.. For the most part these were musical landscapes, like you might liking to a car driving past a constantly changing geographical location.

    I wrote several pieces, where the chords never obviously repeated. Melodies never clearly repeated. While these were interesting musical experiments, they were no-where near commercial. I've also really clamped down on tracks playing chords, which was always the staple of earlier work, and all pop, commercial tunes. It took a while, to move past constant noodling in the correct mode, or scale of current chord.

    As part of the decision to only have 1 - 3 tracks playing chords. A significant amount of tracks had to come up with melodies, that were harmonic of course to current chord implications. But later I discovered they had to say something. not just doodle around in correct scale. A lot of Beatles 'out-takes are popping up that show Beatles songs 'dis-assembled'. I started to realize, that almost all parts had a personality or statement in itself. They had or implied distinct motifs. They had a coherency on their own. A lot of my isolated tracks, while in current key, chord, they just 'wandered' around.

    So it as this late date, I have discovered a basic tenet or 'tool' of music. My favorite saying or interpretation of music, is there are no 'rules, only 'tools'.

    While I like where I am exploring or going. I find it distinctly hard to create music like I did 20 years ago. Where songs were tight ad coherent.

    I like what Yudit and Fastlane said. I wasn't completely aware of the change. but once it was mentioned I realized that's exactly what I did. This has been the result to complete re-doing a lot of tracks, I did with the purpose of making it get inline, and 'pay more attention' to the other players.

    Part of me wishes I had taken more theory, lead voicing, harmony courses when I was younger. But I was a 'rock'n'roll rebel then. Choosing to 'discover' my own rules, (a lot of extra times, discovering what great composers had discovered years or generations ago. Still I like that I did it my way, in spite of the decades wait, to learn what I could have in my teens, or 20's.

    But that is part of the beauty of music. While I can marvel at the proficiency and technique of many here, and also at 'youngcomposers' website. And sometimes be envious that they do it immediately, while it takes me hours and days to arrive at something. It's OK. Unlike the vast majority of music friends I met in teens and 20's.. I am still alive, with most of my brain functional.. and I continue to discover new ideas.

    I read that artists, musicians, and scientists are alike in that many of them describe their work as 'experiments'

    I would also GREATLY appreciate other contributors here to put in a paragraph or two, of their thoughts as they write, or ideas they are trying to express.

    I played in many bands from the age of 14-30. Then quit to only work in studios. The result was the majority of my life I created music alone. There was no-one there to tell me what I just payed was crap, or great. But the band I loved the best had three 3 songwriters. Whosever song it was, gave a fairly long 'story' as to why and what emotions we were trying to emote. The characters, what they were going thru 'I'm horny, I don't have a job, I want with an exotic women, etc). We would encourage each member to think about that as they created their parts. For the most part, we only relayed the chords to songs, and sometimes a motif.

    Indirectly listening to what you very talented guys do here. I listen, learn, and incorporate, what I cab glean from your contributions. Again THANX so much.

  6. #6

    Re: The Nature of Illusion

    Enjoyable and relaxing, as usual from you, Mark. More smooth and homogeneous this time. I do not mind more events and dynamics as I heard previously from you.
    Well done.
    Kjell

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