• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Topic: Symphony No.1 c-minor

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    180

    Symphony No.1 c-minor

    I'd like to present to you my 1st symphony in c-minor which I wrote many years ago and I re-recorded it now.

    1. Andante /Allegro con brio ed appassionato (C-Major / c-minor)

    The first movement is the longest movement I ever wrote but I would not drop single bar

    Structure:

    0:01 Andante, a choral, first in solemn C Major by solo horns, later tragically turning into c-minor
    2:54 Allegro con brio ed appassionato, c minor, 6/8, Exposition
    6:33 Development
    9:16 Recapitulation
    12:57 Coda
    14:38 resuming the choral theme
    15:07 Presto

    http://gerdprengel.de/symphony-1.mp3
    http://gerdprengel.de/symphony-1.pdf (... still needs to be reedited)

    II. Andante cantabile

    The second movement with variations based on a beautiful theme Beethoven sketched for an Andante movement for his planned 10th symphony:

    http://gerdprengel.de/symphony-2.mp3
    http://gerdprengel.de/Symphony-2.pdf

    IV. Allegro con spirito

    http://www.gerdprengel.de/symphony-4.mp3



    Gerd

  2. #2

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Listened to some fragments and the only conclusion I could make is: really great. Occasionally it reminded me of Beethoven, but with a very personal touch. Later today I will listen to the whole first part.

    Congratulations,

    Raymond
    Raymond Robijns
    Youtube channel: "Raymond Robijns"

  3. #3

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Wow, Gerd!

    This is monumental and a more than decent piece of artwork. I agree with Raymond that it has some Beethovenian flavour, but still it is clearly your own composition. It is wise to give us some hints concerning the structure, which makes it a little easier to follow the inner development. You mentioned that it was an early composition and that shows a bit in the common mistake of over-orchestrating. I guess all beginning composers try so hard to bring a complete orchestral work with so many voices and with interesting parts for all the sections and solos, that they overdo it without realising. That is a small remark and - if you like - an advice for further orchestrations to create more contrast with small sections and the full orchestra (as Beethoven applied in almost all his arrangements), or even with solo instruments to create a totally different atmosphere or to connect themes to each other.
    Another small remark concerns the string technique. It has nothing to do with orchestration nor with the quality of the work (which is outstanding!), but with the way some passage sound due to the lack of variation in techniques. You clearly wanted to use spiccati, but sadly enough they are not there. These passages would be a lot lighter with real spiccati. Now I only hear more or less short detaches in a rather mechanical way. That doesn't serve your work well. It has the level of a truly classical piece as to the score and the musical ideas, but that vanishes in the performance here and there. Such a pity!

    As a whole, an excellent composition. I would love to hear the rest!!!

    Jos
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    180

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Dear Raymond and Jos, thank you for your appreciation for my work! Jos, but I didn't quite understand what you wrote regarding "spiccati" -can you give an example?...

    By now I made some corrections and improvements in the phrasing and balance of the voices in the recording which you may hear, and I dropped the heavy tutti beat in the first bar. I love it as it is now!

    And I also added now also the second movement, see the top of this thread. This movement is my dearest slow movement I wrote so far !

    Gerd

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    180

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Now I finished also the 4th movement - the most vivid and jubilent movement I wrote so far. In the development (starting at 4:30) more dark and exotic colours come in):

    http://gerdprengel.de/symphony-4.mp3

    I hope you enjoy it!

    Gerd

  6. #6

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Yes, quite monumental, pieces such as this are NOT my area of expertise. I love how easily you flow from motif so effortlessly.

    Motifs, counterpoint, harmonic voicing, phrasing are excellent. This is clearly a well thought out piece, and quite excellent.
    Use of timpani to strengthen some lines is quite good.. There are so many examples of well thought out an executed bits

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Darmstadt, Germany
    Posts
    180

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Quote Originally Posted by angelonyc View Post
    Yes, quite monumental, pieces such as this are NOT my area of expertise. I love how easily you flow from motif so effortlessly.

    Motifs, counterpoint, harmonic voicing, phrasing are excellent. This is clearly a well thought out piece, and quite excellent.
    Use of timpani to strengthen some lines is quite good.. There are so many examples of well thought out an executed bits
    Thank you so much, Angelonyy, for your strong words of encouragement for the 4th movement!
    I finished now also my score : http://gerdprengel.de/symphony-4.pdf

    Gerd

  8. #8

    Re: Symphony No.1 c-minor

    Hi Gerd,

    Sorry for the long delay, but I had a rather busy time lately.

    When I mentioned the spiccato, I meant (first movement) nearly all the passages in the strings with triplets, sixteenths... which are not slurred (one bow movement). They can be played as a simple detaches, but then they lack some dash, some characterful attack. That doesn't mean that the strings should play louder or stronger, they can continu playing the same volume and even soft attack, but with a very short, distinct bow contact on the string, resonating to the next note (bow up). It's almost the same as a staccato, but staccato is only a short stressed bow attack on the string (no resonating). A staccato is rather rough, whereas a spiccato is subtle and light. In these rhythmic passages some lightness brings in more resonating space and that improves the performance a lot.
    So far for the theoretical and technical part of the story. The practical side is simply this one: do you have spiccato in your strings library? If not, some experimenting with short patches and stresses will be necessary. Shorten the notes to the absolute minimum often has the opposite effect: the recorded patches have a release sample built in and by shorten them too much, they loose that release and sound dull and unnatural.

    Further, I see in your score a lot of written fast passages with the same notes (in percussion and strings). Such an approach always provokes the so called 'machine gun effect', because no player in the world can perform twenty exactly similar notes in a row. But samples can do that easily, however sounding very mechanical... To avoid that, you can use prerecorded repetition notes (e.g. in the Vienna Instruments), or you can tweak the velocities and note durations of every single note in that repetition sequence. The more variation you create, the more natural it will sound. Musicians are not robots and they often play out of rhythm (a bit), out of tune and out of perfect volume indications (here translated in velocity). E.g. the timpani rolls: not one single hit is the same!

    Quite a lot to deal with, I realise, but that's what a DAW is for, because most of the notation programmes are not apt to that job.

    Writing a good score is one giant step, producing a realistic and believable performance is the next.

    Very nice symphony by the way!
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •