• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Topic: "HarpsiDoodles"

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    "HarpsiDoodles"

    All,

    This is my "HarpsiDoodles".

    The instrument is a sampled Blanchet harpsichord made in 1720.

    It is fascinating to me to be able to hear music as it may have been heard
    by our ancestors 298 years ago.



    I used no equalization. This is the actual sound of the 1720 Blanchet instrument!

    Larry G. Alexander




  2. #2
    Senior Member Tom_Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Ellendale, ND
    Posts
    1,537

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    This instrument had to be a prized possession of many large manors. Such a bright sound.

  3. #3

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_Davis View Post
    This instrument had to be a prized possession of many large manors. Such a bright sound.
    In those days they put a lot of quality work into constructing instruments, and they didn't have a lot of fancy tools.

    Thanks, Mister Tom, and a very good day to you.

    Best,

    Larry G. Alexander

  4. #4

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    It is quite lovely, also a great experience to play so precious and beautiful an instrument.

  5. #5

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    Quote Originally Posted by angelonyc View Post
    It is quite lovely, also a great experience to play so precious and beautiful an instrument.

    I have a picture of this wonderful old instrument. When I find it I will post it.

    Thanks for your message.

    Larry G. Alexander

  6. #6

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    I fell in love with the sound of a harpsichord as a teenager in the mid 60's. Although I lived in the Northshore of Boston, Ma. I found a place in NYC store- Zuckerman Harpsichords. They sold Clavichords and Harpsichords.. Completed and also as kits. Because of finances, I bought the Clavichord kit, which of course is a completely different instrument.. The kit now sells for about 50 X the price I paid 50 years ago. I also a contact mike inside the soundboard, to amplify it, and use in our rock band. We could now play The Yardbirds song 'For Your Love'.

    Some well to do friends of my brothers lived in what was originally a 'sea captain's house' in Beverly, Ma. right on the ocean. They bought a very expensive harpsichord.. mostly for looks in their 'sitting room'.. Every time I visited I would play my rendition of 'Greensleeves' because of the harpsichord, classical type counter point, which was the only thing I could play, that sounded 'authentic' on that instrument. Oh what a beautiful sound. An acoustic instrument, like a harpsichord, just sounds so much better in 'real life', than on a recording..

  7. #7

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    Quote Originally Posted by angelonyc View Post
    I fell in love with the sound of a harpsichord as a teenager in the mid 60's. Although I lived in the Northshore of Boston, Ma. I found a place in NYC store- Zuckerman Harpsichords. They sold Clavichords and Harpsichords.. Completed and also as kits. Because of finances, I bought the Clavichord kit, which of course is a completely different instrument.. The kit now sells for about 50 X the price I paid 50 years ago. I also a contact mike inside the soundboard, to amplify it, and use in our rock band. We could now play The Yardbirds song 'For Your Love'.

    Some well to do friends of my brothers lived in what was originally a 'sea captain's house' in Beverly, Ma. right on the ocean. They bought a very expensive harpsichord.. mostly for looks in their 'sitting room'.. Every time I visited I would play my rendition of 'Greensleeves' because of the harpsichord, classical type counter point, which was the only thing I could play, that sounded 'authentic' on that instrument. Oh what a beautiful sound. An acoustic instrument, like a harpsichord, just sounds so much better in 'real life', than on a recording..
    Thanks for your interesting message. I also love the sound of the harpsi. I have composed many music works for the harpsichord. You can access them on my music website if you wish. The link is:

    http://www.alexandermusic.com

    Regards,

    Larry G. Alexander

  8. #8

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    Hi Larry,

    Bravo fo the sampled instrument. Marvellous sound indeed. A big hand also for the piece itself. You mixed a number of styles to a very consistent whole (from strictly baroque to occasionally some early 20th century chords). Just wonderful. You must be Larry to achieve something like this.

    The harpsichord recalls good memories... When I was 20, I visited the Berlin Instrument Museum and I got locked in over noon, busy as I was reading all the information on the historic instruments. Suddenly a warden tapped on my shoulder with a big smile: "What are you still doing here?" I woke from my dream at once, not knowing what to say. He kindly asked for my particular interest. The old harpsichords... Than he let me play something on a 18th century instrument that was used regularly for historic concerts. I can't describe the feeling, but it was so overwhelming! Unfortunately, I don't remember what instrument it was.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Jos
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

  9. #9

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    I went to your website.. I loved all of the music.. Great, accomplished, compositions.

    In the last few years, I have become very keenly aware, the choice of instruments a composer used to realize his/her work.

    Growing up, I was not particularly interested in classical music.. I had listened to many works, but was not interested in writing it. (also didn't have access to musicians) I jumped on the synthesizer band wagon in 1970 or so. An ARP 2600.
    It could make all kinds of sounds, But certainly nothing like 'real instruments'..

    I custom modified my synth with additional LFO's.. So I could come up with synthesized strings. Certainly didn't sound like real strings, but it fit the notch of when strings were wanted on a pop tune, and you didn't have the budget for them.
    Then came all the samplers, and eventually the very sophisticated instrument libraries (Native Instruments, Kontakt. Garritan, 8DIO, etc.

    I had always, picked a pallet of instruments to use in a piece (rock band, a number of synthesizer patches) Much like a classical composer decides what he's going to write for. In the last 15 years, I have become much more aware, of the sounds I put into a piece. Often creating synth patches, or using many of the more exotic Kontakt and UVI libraries there out there.

    The classical composer, had it more direct. He would write for any existing instruments. I've noticed with interest, or what orchestra's would include as standard instruments. How it has evolved over a few hundred years.. It is like evolution, a concise number of instruments, that by different playing techniques, could cover a huge amount of musical works.

    I was struck by the instruments themselves (taking hundreds of years to evolve also) and the combinations of instruments used to carry out a particular motif, for emotional impact.

    The bottom line is a harpsichord first conjures up Christmas for me. The brightness of it. the sound of the plucked strings, etc.

    Listening to the different (all wonderful) compositions you have written.. I noticed the different combinations you would use for a certain piece. Excellent choices.

    Thanx for sharing your link

  10. #10

    Re: "HarpsiDoodles"

    Quote Originally Posted by Max Hamburg View Post
    Hi Larry,

    Bravo fo the sampled instrument. Marvellous sound indeed. A big hand also for the piece itself. You mixed a number of styles to a very consistent whole (from strictly baroque to occasionally some early 20th century chords). Just wonderful. You must be Larry to achieve something like this.

    The harpsichord recalls good memories... When I was 20, I visited the Berlin Instrument Museum and I got locked in over noon, busy as I was reading all the information on the historic instruments. Suddenly a warden tapped on my shoulder with a big smile: "What are you still doing here?" I woke from my dream at once, not knowing what to say. He kindly asked for my particular interest. The old harpsichords... Than he let me play something on a 18th century instrument that was used regularly for historic concerts. I can't describe the feeling, but it was so overwhelming! Unfortunately, I don't remember what instrument it was.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Jos
    Thanks for your message and your intelligent input. I always enjoy hearing from you.

    My best regards to you.

    Larry G. Alexander

Go Back to forum
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •