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Topic: Hammondeg

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  1. #1
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Hammondeg

    This 7 1/2 minute organ work is a close relative of Litzerdeg. Playable by any keyboard genius. Actually, there are a few short bursts of very fast notes. It is a bit wild and chaotic. The score is nearly complete. It has been exported to Sibelius, which sometimes causes some weird errors, uusally easily corrected, but time consuming.


    Hammondeg



  2. #2

    Re: Hammondeg

    I admit I am somewhat fascinated (and a bit perplexed) by the pieces you upload.. How your musical brain works, and the emotional content you put into your work..

    Somedays, this is a perfect sonic representation of how I feel about life, society.. You can certainly get closer to the edge, then I might venture..

    This is a complement. I rarely venture into this realm when recording. Perhaps I should. It helps one to explore/define himself/herself..

    Keep posting these pieces.. They are very valid subjects for studying and enjoyment. In someplace, I feel you cross from controlled into periods of 'chaos', and then reel it back in a bit.. I like the 'out of control' feel because that is like life..

    Back in the 70's.. I was very much involved in analog synthesizers.. I was listening to Milton Babbitt, and early electronic pieces, which were really scientific equipment generating sounds, blips, tones, I composed a 30 minute piece, that really went 'outside'.. I much enjoyed creating it.. Because I ignored all musical rules, I had previously adhered too.

    While I could only stand to listen to very occasionally.. A drummer friend of mine, who was fond of LSD.. listened to it a lot, claiming it opened up whole vista's of sound he could only dream of..

    I find, when I listen to atonal music, or music that ignores, the guidelines of harmony, melody.. It takes a while to become acclimated and open to listening to it.

    This work, challenges me, to temporarily 'let down my boundaries'. Then I can be open to it..


    THANX muchly for your contributions.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Hammondeg

    Well, I always remember what a member of the SF Opera Orchestra told me. Music was here therapy. It has also been so for me. I probably express myself differently than most, but ?


    Hammondeg takes its name from a little word play on Ham and Eggs and Hammond Eggs. Otherewise, no relationship to Hammond organs, although I have certainly played my share of them. For equal treatment, Litzerdeg is derived from Wurlitzer organs.

    Richard

  4. #4

    Re: Hammondeg

    Hi richard,

    I'm glad you've explained the '-deg' titles, because (as a non-native English speaker) I could understand what was in these titles. It looked like some kind of word play and indeed, so it seems to be.

    Forgive me saying that I prefer the piano work. Probably your organ composition is equally good, though but for obvious reasons it sounds very monotonic to me (no sonic variation or dynamic movement attack variation, hardly any difference in sustain-legato-percussive). With that I haven't said at all that this isn't a good composition. It's just a matter of taste and preference. Your musical language is usually hard enough to understand and the greatest merit is undoubtedly that it is always original, coloured with lots of harmonic novelties and inventions. It gives us a very different view on how music can express one's personality. One thing is certain: you don't seek popularity in a broad audience.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Jos
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

  5. #5
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Hammondeg

    I am quite thrilled by music of Chopin, Tchaikovski, Bach, et al. That is what I usually listen to. But the greats of the past have done their job, and done it quite well. There is no way I could add to their body of works. Thus, I play Frank Sinatra, and do it my way, knowing that it will have limited appeal

    Richard

  6. #6

    Re: Hammondeg

    Quote Originally Posted by rwayland View Post
    I am quite thrilled by music of Chopin, Tchaikovski, Bach, et al. That is what I usually listen to. But the greats of the past have done their job, and done it quite well. There is no way I could add to their body of works. Thus, I play Frank Sinatra, and do it my way, knowing that it will have limited appeal

    Richard
    That's a very noble goal. The least one can say is that you have a strong personality which reflects in your music.

    Jos
    Jos Wylin

    http://www.joswyl.be compositions and sampling practices

  7. #7
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: Hammondeg

    Richard,

    This sounds like one of your “wilder”pieces. There seems to be quite a battle going on between the left and right hand. I guess it was a draw and piece was declared.

    I wonder if your expressing the current state of things or maybe just venting about it in a fun way.




    Phil

  8. #8
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Hammondeg

    Well, Phil, this was just a thing I wanted to do. I could not imagine a piece of music to reflect today's events!

    My next piece will probably be a bit more cantabile, unless as usual, I get carried away and let the music go it's own way!

    Richard

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