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Topic: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

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  1. #1
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    News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    We are pleased to announce a special Holiday presentation of The Blue Carbuncle produced by the Quicksilver Radio Theater. Garritan Personal Orchestra is used almost exclusively in the accompanying background music in this radio productions.

    This one-hour radio play will premiere on Sunday, December 28, 2003 at 7p.m., on Max Schmid\'s The Golden Age of Radio - broadcast in the New York City area on WBAI-99.5 FM, and simultaneously Webcast worldwide at www.2600.com.

    Adapted by Producer Craig Wichman, this radio drama was authorized by The Estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. One of the author\'s rare comic tales, and the only one set during Yuletide, the mystery involves Holmes and Watson with several Dickensian Londoners, a dusty hat, a famous gem, - and a goose! As an added treat, Quicksilver will also present the rarely produced short play by famed Holmes portrayer William Gillette, \"The Painful Predicament of Sherlock Holmes\". This play also features GPO in the background. Original music is by Frank Spitznagel, Recording Engineer, Chip Fabrizi (at P.P.I. Recording); and Editor, Dominick Barbera (at SoundtrackNY.) The Director is Jay Stern.

    If you get a chance to listen, I\'m sure you will enjoy these presentations!

    Gary Garritan

  2. #2

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    Just to confirm, that\'s 7pm Eastern Standard Time (GM-5:00)? So, 4pm here in California...

  3. #3
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    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    Yes,

    4pm California time. Which is now...
    Gary

  4. #4

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    People thought the same way when the radio was created. Back in the day it was customary to learn how to play piano and violin and amateurs would entertain themselves at home. But with radio and records things changed and people pushed their children less to learn music. That\'s why grade schools and high schools still have music programs to force music upon the children and see if they relate to it or not. Those who have a passion for it continue and those that do not just purchase CD\'s. Radio also had a major impact on sheet music sales, same as MP3 and CD sales today. So if the record companies want to know how to stop MP3\'s from being pirated, history always repeats itself so look in the past to know the future and the record companies will see the answer there. We must all adapt to technology, trying to stop it is pointless, you can\'t kill an idea!

  5. #5

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    Originally posted by Jaibulu:
    We must all adapt to technology, trying to stop it is pointless, you can\'t kill an idea!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I totally agree on this point. Actually technology always tends to bring fairness and tends to remove many imbalances in society.

    Originally posted by Jaibulu:
    People thought the same way when the radio was created. Back in the day it was customary to learn how to play piano and violin and amateurs would entertain themselves at home. But with radio and records things changed and people pushed their children less to learn music.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">But I dont see the analogy. If technology makes someone listen to music on the radio rather than create his own, well so be it!

    But it is quite another thing if technology allows one to play an orchestra where the identity of individual players is completely lost.

  6. #6

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    What is important is what you identify yourself and not comparing yourself to others or other things. It is inevitable that in the future with a touch of a button a fully amazing orchestral score will be composed by software programs (maybe even Gary will create that [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] but if you are to compare yourself to a software then you would never compose because you would think \"what\'s the point of spending months scoring when a computer can do it instantaneously\". If you fear or compare yourself to technology it will damage your creative output. History books tell us that it took 20 years for Brahmes to write his first symphony because he at many times compared his works to Beethoven and thought how could anybody write anything after Beethoven. Don\'t compare, learn from others. Technology will never destroy musicians, it will just vary. Like I said, look at the past to know the future of musicians and composers. If you want to think in music terms, the future is varitaion on a theme!

  7. #7

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    I was wondering if this is fair...to use a virtual orchestra for a live performance.
    I mean will the virtual orchestra replace a real one in times to come? afterall all these samples were recorded by real players, who do it for their livelyhood.

    I am a big fan of the virtual orchestral samples, especially Garritan, but I often have this dilemma and confusion, and sort of a sense of guilt...for the notes I use were played by someone who I will never know about.

    Suppose I were a concert violinist, I wonder how much I would think before I agree to record all my playing techniques and articulations for a virtual orchestra use...in other words, to give away my lifetime of acquired playing skills for some of money (on that point, I wonder how much these players are paid for recording these samples?).

    Nothing offensive intended, these are just passing thoughts. anyways, this wont certainly prevent me from jumping into the Virtual orchestra bandwagon!

    Happy new year!

  8. #8

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    I believe it is a dilemna, but realize that if a given set of musicians don\'t play for these sessions, then someone else will, and they feel they\'d like to make a little money instead of another.

    I know my grandfather, who was onetime concert master of the Philadelphia Orchestra (before it became the Philharmonic), and a gifted composer in his own right, would have DIED to have this kind of power at his fingertips. He wrote many string quartets because it was a way of testing out his compositions because my aunts and uncle all played different string insturments, a sort of in house \'musicale\'. He only heard his works for full orchestra played a couple of times at rehearsals and the only concert was when his good friend Leopold Stokowski ( who gave his euology at the funeral) finagled the symphony patrons into allowing it.

    I relate the above little story to you so you may understand why one could be excited about this from a composer\'s point of view.

    The other side of the coin is that while living in Las Vegas, I saw MANY great musicians (and there WERE in those days!)in that city lose out to technology. Once I asked my father, about fourty years ago, why they didn\'t show the band in a pit down in front at the shows instead of putting them up high to one side so you only could see the leader, and why they miked the musicians so the audience really only heard them over speakers.

    He told me \"because someday they\'re going to can all this music and people won\'t know or care because it\'s \'canned\' already\"

    Again, musicians lose-out to technology. They always will I\'m afraid.

    I agree with all you who question whether any musicians will be left to record these sounds new in the future.

    But...I cannot resist using it even though my father was eventually forced into an early retirement because of modern technology.

  9. #9
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    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    I\'m constantly exposed to this debate. There is no doubt that musicians loose work due to samples. On the other hand sampled music can provide accompaniment to small scale provincial drama productions which would otherwise be lacking because of the prohibitive costs of having reliable live players. Also a great, motivating tool in education, I have no doubt sample based music enriches culture. It\'s just hard when a new equilibrium needs to be found.

  10. #10

    Re: News: Hear GPO in a Radio Play on Sunday

    This is an interesting thread. I recently met a guy who works for a post house here in Atlanta. I asked him if he needed any music for his productions. He said that they just purchased a soundtrack generating piece of software from Apple (Can\'t remember the name). Apparently it can generate different styles of music, techno, pop, jazz, orchestral. I had a demo of a piece of software that came with Adobe Premeire years ago that did the same thing. You could even tell it how long the piece needed to be and it would assemble a composition from a bunch of pre-recorded \"motifs\" that incidently sounded good. Now this won\'t replace Hans Zimmer but it\'s frightening how technology can replace humans. Why should this post house pay me to write a 30 second background piece for a mattress company\'s commercial when they can push a couple of buttons and \"poof\" instant music. It\'s worse than \"needle drop\" because these people now think they are creating the music in a way. It\'s like the program Acid. Cut and Paste your next hit. No talent required. I worked with a young guy who compared his compositions to mine. At the time I actually used 7 pieces of hardware and a sequencer to compose. I played each note and could tell him what notes they were, what key the song was in etc. He used Acid to cut and paste from the existing libraries. Most people here at work didn\'t understand the difference. These type of technologies also take away the small opportities for the budding composer. I\'m sure that we all know people that have lost jobs to technology but when a machine starts to produce our music, paintings, etc. will we all go back to flipping burgers? Weren\'t machines supposed to flip the burgers so that we had more time to create our art??? With all this said, I am thrilled at these sample libraries that give me the abilility to mock up an orchestra. I guess it may be a little hypocritical, but keep producing these libraries, just leave the composing to us humans.

    Darren

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