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<font size=\"4\">Gary Garritan presents the third in a series of GOS &quot;Meet the Artist&quot; Interviews:</font>
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<font size=\"3\">We are honored to have David Govett as our featured guest in this edition of the GOS &quot;Meet the Artist&quot; Interviews. Dave was the very first person ever to use GigaSampler He has been with Nemesys from the beginning, even before it hit the market. Dave is a world-recognized expert on GigaSampler/Studio and knows this amazing sampling technology better than anyone. Before his adventure with GigaSampler, he spent many years composing for popular video games such as Wing Commander, US Navy Fighter and over 100 other games.

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<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Firstly, congratulations on your work developing the GigaSampler / GigaStudio. This is indeed a very exciting time to be in midi music production! Having come from a background of constantly worrying about memory and midi channel limitations, Giga is a total God-send! Can you share with us some of the background story behind the invention of GigaStudio?</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">Submitted by Rob Kral

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[David Govett]

Well, to start off, I didn&#x2019;t invent the technology. I just got in on the years before the release and helped advise on features that I would want as a composer and helped them with ideas for the interfaces. Back in those years, I was working on various computer game scores but was seriously limited in sampling capacity and budget to say the least. I was prepared to try to get a loan of 50 grand or so just for a bunch of samplers full of over priced RAM at the time. I even spent weeks trying to tweak some of my woodwinds in the sound blaster with the Vienna software and was working on reducing my samples down to mono and all that crap! (things that would only take minutes to do today) I was even putting some samples on my hard disk system (The first Soundscape in Texas) to handle things like loops, long basses, percussion hits etc. Sort of a primitive GigaSampler. Then I read about this GigaSampler in the Keyboard NAMM report and was floored. The piano they were showing off was larger than my whole Miroslav library for God Sakes! Come to find out, they were right here in town so needless to say, I stalked the NemeSys folks for a while and hung out with them, helped them out and next thing you know, they hired me. (Sleep, who needs sleep?) As to the background, I do know that the NemeSys Team started off at Brooktree doing virtual sound card work. They were the first people to ever do host based samples instead of chip based ones and that work is on many products and sound cards that are out today. That was the start of the endless wave Giga technology. At the time I met the crew, they were still based at Brooktree and were moving to their new offices at the current NemeSys HQ. It was quite cool to be a part of history. Kind of like working on that first so called &#x201C;stupid&#x201D; Sci Fi film that many studio execs were very skeptical about. (&#x201C;That Lucas fool just doesn&#x2019;t know what he is doing&#x201D; said they)




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Dave, Could you give us a quick synopsis about your past experiences with music technology and how you came to be one of the giga gurus?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Kobb</font>


[David Govett]

See the above question for some of the details. I was working with a K2000 and GM synths at the time and desperate for more polyphony and more RAM, more sounds, etc.

I started off with a Casio synth back in the late 80s and an Atari ST and a Tascam 4 track cassette recorder and an Alesis MIDI verb II! That was it! Over the years I have slowly upgraded to various synths and samplers as was affordable going from MT-32 to Akai X-7000 sampler, to Roland U-220 to an EPS sampler to the K2000 and now of course Gigastudio and lots of nice and affordable software and samples. On the Atari ST, I was using Dr Ts sequencer. Later I upgraded to a Mac with Logic software and later to PCs running logic. Right now, I have several PCs that I use for many things but each one has a GigaStudio on it of course. I use Logic Audio for sequencing, Vegas Video for Video editing and audio tracking and am learning Nuendo for a possible mixing environment. I have no outboard effects at this time, just internal virtual ones. I definitely plan on going all digital when the time and budget allow. I went to the music store to see if any of the large analog consoles were getting affordable with all the new computer based tools but not yet compared to what I can do with computers and audio hardware. For the price of one of those outrageous 24 channel boards, I could do a complete 128 input (or more) system with computers, plugins and DSP cards. That is where I&#x2019;m headed anyway.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Do you realize that GigaSampler / GigaStudio has got to be the biggest, most important step forward in electronic music production since midi? If not, that\'s at least how I feel about it! GigaSampler gave us 16 midi channels, then GigaStudio gave us 64. Can the software ever be expanded to include more midi ports? GigaSampler did not appear to me to be a quick overnight success, but now seems to have really taken off. Personally I felt a lot of high end users were initially very skeptical. Were you surprised that it\'s acceptance by midi users was so gradual?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Rob Kral

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[David Govett]

It did seem to take a little while. I think some of it was logistics in getting the product ready for prime time and getting it into peoples hands and getting them to take software synths seriously. Notice that it is NemeSys that single-handedly created this industry and make software instruments a viable thing. (IMOHO!) Now look at all those copycats run with it. That&#x2019;s the way it goes. Plenty of hard disk tools out there but the standard is Pro Tools after all these years. I think the Giga Platform will be setting the standard for some time. It can also be hard for a small startup company to get things rolling as quickly as they would like. Also, it was a brand new platform without a lot of custom libraries. It took a while to get the developers up to speed and going. Things are certainly good and up to speed now though to say the least.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">While at Nemesys, when did you think giga finally &quot;took off&quot;? In the not so near future?---

Why do you think Giga seems to have been &quot;picked up&quot; by (maybe just vocal) orchestral composers and not by other composers who use hardware samplers?

submitted by KingIdiot

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[David Govett]

We&#x2019;ll of course at the first NAMM show that I did, it was a huge buzz. But I felt that it really sky rocketed with the huge surprise introduction of the GigaStudio at a later NAMM show. That was the fine work of Francis Prev keeping a lid on things and helping us hit the industry all at once with that surprise NAMM introduction. Then things went to a whole new level once Hanz Zimmer got into the platform. I helped configure and install his very first system and that seems to be the moment when the orchestral composers really woke up to the product. Before we even met him, his people said to not even think about an endorsement deal because he simply doesn&#x2019;t do endorsements for anything&#x2026;period. We&#x2019;ll, the product won his heart and spread throughout the Media Ventures complex and it became very important to him that this platform succeed and not fail. Not only was it the best sampling system he had dealt with, but he converted his system to them. (20 plus systems in his room alone) So he did a huge endorsement ad for the GigaStudio to help ensure that it would succeed and he also contributed ideas that made it into the GigaStudio. Another huge name that jumped on board was LA producer David Kahne He recently produced Paul McCartney&#x2019;s latest album and all the orchestrations were from his Giga systems. They planned to use live musicians but like the sampled results enough to keep them instead.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi Dave. Please say something about the Tascam buy-out of Nemesys. What are Tascam\'s motives and directions for the product as you see it? Are there plans for a GigaStudio embedded system (ie. hard-disk recorder, or DSP card, or stand-alone sequencer, etc)? How much development is going on in Montebello? Thanks very much!

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Neal Keane</font>


[David Govett]

It&#x2019;s only the coolest thing to ever happen to the product and the people involved. The Tascam folks are very cool and huge fans and supporters of the Giga Platform. Now, they take care of all the marketing, funding, distribution and tech support while the NemeSys programmers are now dedicated full time to working on the product and not distracted with the day-to-day grind of running a company while trying to create. The release of new products and versions is probably going to be much quicker and more on schedule not to mention opportunities to really enhance the technology and stay ahead of the copycats with big budgets. The NemeSys programmers are still here in Austin Texas at the original offices and they teleconference and travel to work things out with the Montebello crew. From what I gather, they are being treated very well by Tascam and there are non of the typical acquisition nightmares that we often hear about with other company buy outs. There were absolutely &#x201C;no&#x201D; forced layoffs. Every existing NemeSys employee was offered work if they wished to relocate or a real nice deal if not. As far as Tascam&#x2019;s dedication to the product, lets just say I was amazed to see most of their NAMM floor space dedicated to the Giga products! They are really behind it one hundred percent. I don&#x2019;t know what their intentions are for hardware but it is Tascam after all so if I was placing a bet, I would think that this could be a possibility. Also, I think they might eventually if not already use the programmers to help enhance some of the software on their hardware toys. (just speculation on my part) Right now, they are working on some cutting edge technology to further enhance the sampling world and to solve some previously thought unsolvable problems. Oh yeah and there will finally be some 24 bit solutions with the next major upgrade.


<font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Was there a favorite period of time you look back on during Giga\'s early days? </font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Rob Kral

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[David Govett]

I guess the days before the release were kind of nice. I was the only GigaSampler user in the whole world (literally) and the tech support line was really quiet with a user base of one. After the release, it was a wild ride. We went from a user base of one (me) to one (me) versus the whole world over night. The cool moments were the NAMM shows, working with Hanz Zimmer and traveling around the U.S and the world.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\"> Just curious what\'s running in your studio and why you like to work with that specific equipment? (how many giga machines and how they\'re set up; other samplers (BLASPHAMY!!); sequencer/audio program; board; controllers; etc.)

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Kobb

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[David Govett]

Blasphemy indeed! No other samplers other than my K2000 and it is just a controller now so that doesn&#x2019;t count. Right now, I&#x2019;m using 4 systems and one of them runs both the Logic sequencer and a GigaStudio. I run everything through a standard Mackie analog board to hear everything and I can mix down to hard disk tracks or DAT for quick mixes but I can also capture everything into Vegas or Nuendo to do a better mix using all virtual DSP. I can then take my hard drive over to Larry Seyer if I need a real good mix. I plan to eventually (with time and budget of course.. you all can help with this by getting my GigaStudio Mastery course&#x2026 invest in a system or two just dedicated to Nuendo and that will be my real time mixing board with surround. I priced analog consoles and they are a rip off compared to what I can do with a computer or two and the right audio cards. I&#x2019;m using Logic because I have been using it for many years. When I started using it, there was no other competition that even compared. If I was starting fresh, I would consider Cubase for sure. The two or fairly equal so I just tell people to use the one they are use to.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Do you think that libraries are programmed to their fullest?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by King Idiot

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[David Govett]

Some are, some are not. Good examples of fullest programming are the Scarbee basses and the Garritan Strings. There are many nice libraries out there however that do not use the full potential of the product of course but they are still worth having and very well done. I also like the work that Nick Phoenix does. He has a knack of making really usable and expressive samples that just fit in and simply work.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi Dave, Thanks for coming in to answer questions. I know you mostly for your work developing sample libraries and producing music demos, so I\'m curious about your opinions. Endless questions... what do you think are the most useful features that a sample library can offer you? What things are/could be powerful for sample users but are overlooked? Favorite sample libraries - what makes them great in your mind?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Jeff Hurchalla

</font>[David Govett]

Wonderful questions. Several things I like in libraries.

I want at least 4 velocity levels and stereo samples. I don&#x2019;t need chromatic samples though. If I do any libraries myself someday, I will probably not go chromatic. I get more bang for the buck with more expressions and articulations than chromatic samples. I tend to take my large chromatic libraries that I own and reduce them myself. I get more out of having more instruments loaded than having less instruments with chromatic samples.




Also, I like up and down bows for strings, left and right percussion hits, alternate samples in wood and brass so that I can play fast repeating notes with two hands or the Maestro Tools very quickly and realistically. This is absolutely essential these days and I can&#x2019;t live without this feature at all. I even customize older libraries by copying the regions down a couple of octaves, then changing the unity note by a half step, then dragging those notes up a half step and then I have alternate samples to trigger with each hand octaves apart. It&#x2019;s not as good as the real thing but it is a huge improvement. Try playing a brass fanfare one note at a time making three passes compared to simply playing them with two hands with the up and down bow style of playing and you will see what I mean. It saves hours of time and is more realistic.




Last but not least, I like runs, riffs, effects, trills, expressive swells, anything that lets the musician do as much of the work for me as possible.




I still have huge respect for the Miroslav library. It is still one of the most expressive and beautiful libraries out there even with today&#x2019;s new competition. Of course for strings, you can&#x2019;t beat the GOS library. I use it and I use some of the Miroslav Expressive strings but that&#x2019;s about it. I like the effects, runs and trills on Advanced orchestra but I don&#x2019;t use the sustain notes from that library. I also like the Dan Dean Brass &amp; Woodwinds and some of the Quantum leap brass instruments. Oh yeah and of course my favorite and exclusive percussion and timpani, nothing but DS sound ware Ultimate series (great job Sean and Donnie). I&#x2019;m a percussionist and timpanist and I can vouch for these.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hey Dave a couple more, What do *YOU* wish you could do with samplers (no limits)? with common sense limits? What do you think are the limits of samples/sample playback?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by King Idiot

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[David Govett]

The main two things I notice that are hard to do is to manually play realistic trills and emulate drawbars on an organ. Also, I find loop based samples to be more appropriate for audio sequencers or programs like acid. I like having them online and accessible for instant playback in GigaStudio but I find the other programs better for changing pitch and time stretching and for accessing the samples from anywhere in the file without re-triggering. The need to re-trigger is also another weakness of sampling and especially for this new hard disk based technology. . I wouldn&#x2019;t hold it past the programmers to try and address these things though. For most orchestral stuff, I personally like sampling the best though.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">What do you think of Physical Modeling? Where do you see Sampling in the near future?--

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by KingIdiot

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[David Govett]

I haven&#x2019;t been all that crazy about it yet (for orchestral and ensembles that is). Sure it&#x2019;s expressive and all but it can also be hard to work with and play and still is not as realistic as a musician playing his instrument in a room of some sort. I do like the Mic and room modeling technologies though. Also, it seems that large ensembles are not as doable with PM. I&#x2019;m not sold on it yet but I bet I&#x2019;ll like it eventually as it matures. It will be a good addition to a sampler setup for solo instruments at least. I would have to have a system that is easy to play because one of the main uses of sampling is to be able to play all these instruments without having to spend a lot of time practicing or learning them. That&#x2019;s what the original players were recorded for in the first place. Let their hard work do as much of the work for you as possible. That brings up another point about sampling. With samples, there is a human element that involves a dedicated musician with years of experience and usually a well-made instrument. The exceptions for me are the modeled drawbar organs. They seem to be very realistic and you can make an infinite combination of settings that would be way too monumental for sampling.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">And... I had read somewhere that your live demonstrations of GOS at NAMM were pretty amazing. Could you share some of your techniques for getting the most realism out of a live performance using GOS and other giga libraries. Thanks in advance, Dave. Looking forward to the tutorial. And thank you Gary for setting up these interviews - I enjoyed reading the replies of your previous guests.

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Kobb

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[David Govett]

To start off, one advantage I had is that I&#x2019;m a percussionist so I can really jam on those up and down bows two octaves apart in real time and blow people away. That was my main secret for demonstrating the GOS strings. Also, for doing demos, I make sure to have mixed down demos mapped to keys using the GigaStudio to trigger them. Trying to demonstrate using live sequencer just doesn&#x2019;t work very well in a live show environment because you have to quickly change gears and reload new samples for each song and all and many real big demo songs are created with multiple systems. It&#x2019;s much faster to just have them at your fingertips. Also, since I am a drummer, I&#x2019;m not much of a keyboardist so I will let the great keyboard players that come around the booth sit down and play and make the instruments really look and sound good.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">On GigaHarp, you have a MIDI file that permits you to do harp glisses. However, this is not clearly documented in the package. So, what are the steps to execute this?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Peter Alexander

</font>[David Govett]




It wasn&#x2019;t documented because most of the libraries that include MIDI files have not been including documentation but it does seem in this special case that it would be helpful. The first thing to do is understand how the concept works with those Glissando harps. These are the variations that have not black keys mapped, just white keys, c-b, 7 notes, just like the real harp strings. The help file shows the specific controllers but basically you treat the instrument just like a real harp with harp pedals. All the C notes are controlled by one MIDI controller, all the Ds by another and so on for a total of 7 different MIDI continuous controllers, one for each key. Making adjustments to these controllers stretches the pitch of all of the same notes up and down in half steps just like real harp pedals. The right combination of settings makes for accurate glissandos by strumming the white keys. All that the MIDI files do is make those adjustments instantly. All they consist of are 7 MIDI controller settings at the beginning and nothing else. All you have to do, is load a Glissando harp to a MIDI channel of your choice and in your sequencer, load one of the MIDI files or copy the controllers from one of them to the track in your sequencer where you have the harp assigned. Once the sequencer plays through those controllers, the harp will be zapped and strumming the white keys will produce a very nice glissando. As you can see it&#x2019;s harder to explain in writing than to demonstrate. You will certainly appreciate that section of my tutorials that deals with this. So. what I have set up in my Logic sequencer, is that I have copied all the MIDI files for the harp library into my template and they just hang out at the bottom of my screen on some unassigned MIDI channels as little 1 measure segments. All I have to do is drag them onto the Glissando harp track or tracks where I want the key changes to occur. To experiment, I also assign the harp to a bunch of MIDI channels and put one MIDI file segment at the beginning of all those tracks and hit the play button. That zaps each copy of the harp to the specific controls and then I can page up and down the MIDI tracks and play with various glissandos. I hope this helps.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">In DSP station, I\'d like to see you walk through the signal flow for applying the NFX effects in the Auxes, vs. as channel inserts. Under Settings -&gt;Sampler, what are your suggested settings for the Buffer &amp; Alter Transition voices for block chords? The GigaStudio manual, at one time, discussed the cascading effect setup with the Auxes when using NFX. Could you clarify more what this means?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Peter Alexander

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[David Govett]

The complete DSP and mixing route is well covered from MIDI channel, to DSP mixer channel, mixing, automation, level setting, effect inserts or aux sends and finally assigning to physical outputs. In general, you want to learn the auxes to save on CPU power. They work just like a real mixer and allow you to apply various levels of the same reverb to several channels.

The buffer setting you refer to is the setting for when you use the capture to wave tool. I suggest starting with the default 1 meg setting and increase it only if you have any trouble with glitches in your captures. I always use the lowest setting for transition voices for orchestral multi channel composing. We recommend raising that number if you have a heavy piano or organ part and you need to protect some of the notes that are being sustained. 12 is usually a good setting for that. I try to use the least possible though. It may require some experimenting to get the right settings.

You can cascade effects both in the inserts and with the aux busses. It simply means you put two effects like reverb for instance on a channel instead of just one. You can then uncheck the left side of one of them and the right side of the other one and get a nice quality true separate stereo reverb. (using twice the DSP of course)

<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi, Since a lot of GS users have a dedicated Giga computer it would be nice if there could be some kind of network solution for connecting the GS computer to the Sequencer computer. Is that something possible and something you are working on? Maybe something like Steinberg&acute;s VST System Link.

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by steve_t

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[David Govett]

I don&#x2019;t know of anything going into the Giga platform but that would be real cool. However check out www.musiclab.com for the MIDI Replicator. It does allow multiple MIDI ports using the network. Kevin has been using it for some time and says it works great! I&#x2019;m going to try it myself here today. I have been limited by the MIDI interfaces on my computers to 1 or two ports but it looks like I can get all 4 on each machine for free! (the program is 29 bucks or so) I avoided this because the older technology like this I heard about required opening one copy for each port you want to use and was very tricky to use. The only warning is to keep network traffic low so you should have your own studio hub for this before going to the rest of the office.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi Dave, It is probably a mutual feeling among most PC users that Windows is a sad excuse for an OS for multimedia. Was there ever a time that you thought to go with the Mac OS instead of Windows? If so, what prevented you? Have you ever had dreams of creating an OS/sampler/sequencer stand alone that would meet the multimedia user\'s dreams. (There are a lot of stand alone hard disk recorders but never have seen them integrated with a midi sequencer and sampler and OS in one package). I for one would buy such a package of OS, sampler and sequencer if I knew it would be stable. Any plans for such a project?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Marty

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[David Govett]

The program was PC based before I even came on the scene due to the expertise of the programmers at low level programming for PC audio. Setting up a complete Mac crew was simply unrealistic in the early years and now that Tascam is on board, who knows. I personally would hope that their resources would more likely go to hardware instead of a special Mac version. Most Mac users simply sequence and mix on their Macs and run a fleet of Giga machines from the Mac sequencer these days.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">What\'s the value of enabling or not enabling Dither type and why? For the instrument editor, what are the five most common tweaks you see that commercial sample libraries need, and what are the general steps to execute them? Thanks, Dave.

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Peter Alexander

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[David Govett]

If the audio card you are using is limited to 16 bit playback, then you must use the dither or you will hear audio noise kicking in and out when you play the sampler. However, if your card (like most of the pro ones) is 24 bit capable, then turn it off. You don&#x2019;t need it at that point. It&#x2019;s just there to help 16 bit limited cards sound smoother.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">For the Ports, since GOS takes advantage of the MIDI control surface, could you give us a more clearer walk through of that. Other than GOS, I\'m not aware of other libraries that take advantage of this section of the board.

submitted by Peter Alexander

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[David Govett]

As you see from your earlier questions, Gary&#x2019;s other library (the harp) also uses them but the main libraries that put the controllers to use are the drum set libraries which allow you to adjust the dry and wet level of everything individually on a single MIDI channel. You basically need to check the documentation of the libraries to see what they take advantage of.






<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hello Dave, First of all I\'d like to congratulate you and the rest of the team for the success of GigaStudio which has by far been one of the best purchases I have ever made. I was wondering if there are any plans for creating a better reverb for Giga. NFX reverb is not bad, but was wondering if even a better reverb could be made for GigaStudio or possibly an effect like Cakewalks Soundstage for orchestral stuff. Thanks for your time!

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Damon

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[David Govett]

I was just reading a thread on the Tascam forum about that and it sounds like they are working on some third party solutions. The NFX format is very efficient and is proprietary so developers would need to do a special version just for it unless they make the GigaStudio DirectX and VST capable. Also, the current effects are very efficient and created by the programmers who did the streaming technology in the first place and they programmed them at the kernel level in assembly language. As far as I can tell, many third party effects will probably not be quite as efficient as the current native ones done by NemeSys but I hope they can get some going soon.






<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi Dave! I was wondering if you could give us a hint of things to come with GigaStudio. What developments are happening for future releases?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Phattlippz

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[David Govett]

Can&#x2019;t give any real hints now other than the plans for 24 bit sample playback options. What I can say is that they are actually solving some huge problems with sampling in general. We are talking about things that people didn&#x2019;t even consider as solvable but just compromises and limitations that are necessary when using samples. There is some very clever, &#x201C;thinking outside the box&#x201D; stuff going into the next version that you all will be very pleased with. There is also much more that even I am not privy too. All I can say is &#x201C;prepare to be humbled&#x201D;




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hello Dave, Congratulations on your accomplishments over the last few years with Giga Studio/Sampler, and also on your upcoming Tutorial program! I know it will be extremely helpful for many of us! Kip

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Bardstown Audio

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[David Govett]

Thanks Kip. Keep up the good library work.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hello Dave, Thanks for giving us the opportunity. I am curious about the scoop of your upcoming Giga tutorial. Since you have been part of the developing team for the software, will you go into details such as: How the response curves actually work considering the sample amplitude, sample attenuation, and midi velocity? At the moment I always wind up trying every possible alternative, before choosing a setting. Also: Will you include information about how the midi numbers in the frequency settings for filters correspond to actual frequencies? A tutorial that would shed some light on the inner works of GigaStudio would be great. A lot of the work in programming an instrument is pure empirical work without this information. Any other info about the tutorial would also be appreciated. Thanks, Hans

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Hans Adamson

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[David Govett]

I&#x2019;m actually working those two lessons up right now on the response curves and the filters. I&#x2019;m creating some graphics that will help explain exactly what is happening when you strike the notes or adjust the filter cutoffs. In fact, as much experience that I have with this product, even I am learning a few things as we speak.

(tutorial plug ahead!)

The tutorial starts off with several lessons on installing and registering the software including some things to keep in mind when upgrading from the older GigaSampler. Then there are some overviews of the interface and then a section on getting sounds from CD-ROM to hard disk, finding them manually or with the search engine, various ways of loading them, then how to manage them once they are loaded, and last of all, saving performances. There is an S-Converter intensive of 25 minutes and a section on the powerful distributed wave tool that demonstrates the power of a quicksound enhanced sound effects library. (premiere edition) In the editor, we start with some tutorials on the wizard tool, drag &amp; drop mapping of a complete drum kit and all the adjustments of it. (all the samples needed are included with the tutorial set) and how to import, merge and combine instruments. Then there is a button by button section covering all the edit parameters and a lesson on the powerful graphical edit tools and much more. It will be a good 5 hours of lessons in a workshop format with me and Kevin Phelan (formerly of NemeSys tech support, my successor) We didn&#x2019;t script it at all since that turned out to be real boring so we just ran sound, ran camera, ran the screen capture software and went for it in half hour and hour long takes. If we messed up, we just picked up and kept going because stopping all the machines and logging the various media and takes was like stopping a train and would kill the flow. That would then be all synched up and edited in Vegas Video down to the final videos. We also used good quality mikes instead of clip on lavalieres and the quality is so much better and very clear. It&#x2019;s studio quality but on the fly. It&#x2019;s a very unorthodox format for computer tutorials but we think people will like it and find it refreshing. Like I said, it is like attending an afternoon seminar at your own pace. It will be 4 or so disks for CD-ROMS and there is the ability to make a DVD-ROM version that will fit on a single disk. I kept all the editing in 29 frames, stereo for the possibility of generating a digital video master for VCR. I kept everything very simple, user friendly, dummy proof to some extent and reliable. It should play on just about any PC computer flawlessly without having to install anything (other than the video codec) to the drive or copy any of the files over. It all runs right off the CD-ROM disk and the audio plays through any card that can do 22khz audio. On each disk is a large help file with the video clips embedded in them so the disk is real simple and clean. Just double click on the help file, go to the link you want to see, and hit the play button and scroll the video with a little slider. No waiting at all for the videos to buffer like some tutorials I have. (up to a minute or two every time I want to open them) Mine is instant and simple. I hope you all enjoy it.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Could you share your philosophy for producing demos, and any helpful tricks?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Jeff Hurchalla

</font>


[David Govett]




Hey there, nice to hear from you. Beautiful work on those guitar demos by the way. That question should actually be from me to you truth be told.

The main thing I like to do is use the most realistic and exciting samples and also I try to let the samples (the players actually) do as much of the work for me as possible. I refuse to play in trills when there are nice samples that do it for me. There is no comparison in realism. My 8 meg, mono Advanced Orchestra Trills simply trump my 700 meg flute library trying to play them in with the sequencer. However, for sustained notes, the Dan Dean flute is a no-brainer. I like to use effects when possible. A good example is my virtual John Williams modeled piece on my web site (www.davidgovett.com) On this piece after the fanfare and chase music, the music changes to a huge bombastic down and upbeat theme, I&#x2019;m using the AO flute riffs on the up beats and I even start the first one off with a shrill AO flute over blowing effect. Check it out and listen carefully and you will see what I mean about how powerful these riffs can be. This technique allows me to compose more realistic stuff much quicker. After all, John Williams doesn&#x2019;t have to practice and key in all the parts by hand like we do, why should we not take as much advantage of those sampled players as possible.

I also like melodies that can be hummed and remembered. I like the familiar commercial sound as opposed to the music school sound of trying to be so original that the music is not pleasant to listen to. The latest research shows that melodies can actually get etched into our brains and the reason they bounce around our head and don&#x2019;t go away is because replaying the tune in our head is sort of like scratching an itch. That is the brain science of memorable melodies.

I just try to make it as pretty and realistic and big as possible. I try to make a good first impression with the songs I do.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hey Dave, Being a top Guru on GigaStudio must have you in position for many interesting things. This no doubt would make you a very busy person. What other projects have you been working on since Nemesys and are there any plans for GigaStudio tours/seminars. Maybe we\'ll have you up our way soon. Thanks again for coming to and supporting our forums. PaPa Chalk

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by PaPa Chalk

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">What type of work are you now involved in?

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Rob Kral

</font>[David Govett]




Oh yeah, I would love to come up to your area again. In all my time with NemeSys, the hands down biggest, best, most professional and flawless seminar was the one you guys put on! Just let me know when you need me out there. I know that Tascam does some seminars with Dave Casey (ironically another big guy with long hair, goatee beard and Giga Expert named Dave) and I shall continue to do similar things privately but not as a Tascam rep. I also do phone consulting and in person consulting, training and help people set their systems up. I do charge a good premium price to leave my wife and get on airplanes these days.

Since NemeSys, I have been working on many library designs and conversions for NemeSys, Miroslav, Zero-G, East West, Premiere edition sound effects library and working on my tutorial. The tutorial has unfortunately been a back burner project for some time, due to the library workload and of course that silly little desire I have to pay bills and not starve. I finally got to a place where I was caught up on projects and able to drop the gigs for a few months to finish this project up. (Desert storm Marine Corp vet will do libraries for food)




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi, Dave: Thanks for taking time away from your tutorial project to answer these questions. 1. What are you composing these days? 2. Tell us a bit about your &quot;composing environment.&quot; For example, do you put pen to paper first? 3. In which styles and for which genres do you tend to write? 4. What haven\'t you done as a composer that you would like to accomplish before you . . . well, you know? Cheers, Pat

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">Submitted by PatS

</font>


[David Govett]




1. Just some demos of my composing and updating my resume right now until I catch up on the current projects. I also help out here at Team Fat on various projects for Games and albums. (see www.fatman.com for details on team fat and our game composing careers)




2. I don&#x2019;t do paper. I sequence everything by playing the parts in by keyboard. I mix to hard disk tracks right now just using the basic NemeSys effects but am working at getting a complete Nuendo studio going as my future mixing environment.




3. Usually big orchestral pieces and I have a flair for western sound and military styles and soft romantic pieces.




4. I just want to hear some of my work done completely with no compromises due to various limitations of time and budget. One of my goals is to get set up with enough resources to have everything online at once and be able to mix it all live through my dream digital mixing environment without any hassles or limitations and with a workable template that doesn&#x2019;t have to change for each song. Basically what we all strive for as composers and sampling musicians.






<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hi Dave, Thanks for participating in the Forum. These interviews have been very helpful to many of us. First, let me say that GigaSampler technology is one of most exciting advances for composers in years. Your work with Nemesys will allow many composers to make a better living by making better sounding music, and that is a real contribution. Thanks! My question is: Are there plans for any Giga seminars? It would be great to get an intensive over a day or 2? Thanks Again,

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Garius Hill

</font>


[David Govett]

I don&#x2019;t know of any but there are a few options. One will be the tutorial that I&#x2019;m finishing up. It is a workshop of over 5 hours of detailed instruction on using the whole product. It is done in workshop format and not scripted so it is similar to what you need. Dave Casey at Tascam does travel and do clinics but I don&#x2019;t know if they are doing workshops. Also, I do the occasional workshop in Los Angeles when I travel there so I&#x2019;ll keep the user forum informed the next time I do that.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Hello &amp; thanks for the opportunity... In the early days of Nemesys I surfed to the site and saw that there was a sort of hardware-version of the gigasampler in progress. Never heard of it since...(or was I delirious?) Are there any plans of making a sort of an hardware-version. It would definitely end the era of the Yamaha\'s, Akai\'s etc.

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by EARLGREY

</font>


[David Govett]

What you saw was probably the first rackmount computer systems that we were configuring for people like Hanz Zimmer and others. Now, Sound Chaser has taken on that role with a vengeance. See my earlier responses about hardware possibilities.




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">... are you doing composing as well since leaving Nemesys?</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Jeff Hurchalla

</font>


[David Govett]

Not a whole lot just yet but what I do is infinitely better than it use to be with my new gear, libraries and of course experience. My next project is to update my resume and possibly line up an agent. I also plan to do more instructional products if the GigaStudio Mastery does well. Some of my work is at www.davidgovett.com (looks like I need to update it.)




<font color=\"#3e2dff\">Do you think you could work with a 500k bank for a full song anymore? I only ask that last one because you guys have spoiled me I\'m on a project that requires just that.....no reverb...and full interactive music....you guys have caused me MUCH frustration just because I NOW know it can be MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH MUCH better.... If I only could stream from a hard disc...

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by KingIdiot

</font>


[David Govett]




Yes but despite the fact that it won&#x2019;t sound quite as good as a full sampled orchestra, the price I would have to charge would still be the same if not double for the extra time required to make it sound worth anything. (it&#x2019;s much faster to compose with good samples and samplers) So yes, for a good fee I can do it. Otherwise, I would make more money per hour working at the mall and would probably enjoy it more. (yes I&#x2019;m very spoiled and I sympathize with you more than you can imagine)




I have always hated with a great passion working with limited sounds. I did the best I could for some of the game gigs but you can ask the Fatman (www.fatman.com) and he will tell you about how I incessantly bitched about dealing with sound limitations. (it never ends, I want more Giga machines even now) You will find that when you deal with such limited pallets, you can get real creative and it will improve your work when you get back to dealing with the better sounds. However, I can spend hours trying to make a limited pallet sound as good as I can and then watch in horror as a single solo note of a good sample blows all that work away as far as realism and just simply sounding good. A solo flute or oboe sample all by itself can express more than a whole pallet of tiny pathetic samples. What got me into MIDI in the first place was all the cool sounding synths and samplers so it is real tough to deal with puny sounds or limits.




Some tricks to try are simply doubling parts, panning them hard left and right, adjusting the pitch bend a tiny bit to create a chorusing effect. Try some MIDI delays to simulate a little reverb. For instance, take a woodwind melody, copy it to 3 MIDI tracks, have the main one front and center or where ever you want to pan it, then delay the other two tracks to create a couple of delay taps, pan those hard and pull their volume down and see if that helps any. That&#x2019;s the kind of stuff we did in the early days at Team Fat for the old games. For the original Nintendo Total Recall and Maniac Mansion, we were limited to three monophonic melodic instruments and a one armed drummer.






<font color=\"#3e2dff\">And finally... WWWHHHHHAT is your favorite color?!!!

</font><font color=\"#3e2dff\">submitted by Kobb

</font>


[David Govett]

I have no single favorite but I do like the combination of d&eacute;cor that includes burgundy and green and marble surfaces. I also like how colors can be used to affect the mind, mood and spirit. Check out http://www.divineparadox.com to see some neat color tools and concepts and to see where I come from philosophically.




Thank you all for these perfect questions! Everything I wanted to say is well covered by answering your questions. Keep up the good composing and remember to cultivate as much reverence for the samples we use since they literally represent many human lifetimes dedicated to music.




I like this type of interview because I won&#x2019;t just disappear, never to be heard from again.. I&#x2019;ll still get to be here on the forum with all my friends. I&#x2019;m looking forward to our continued conversations on these forums.




Peace and L.V.X. (Light) be with you all until our next posts.




David Govett

[size=\"1\"][ 04-21-2003, 09:04 PM: Message edited by: Garritan ][/size]