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Topic: What are they actually saying?

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  1. #1

    What are they actually saying?

    I\'m working on a new piece with some dramatic VOTA chords, but as stupid as
    this sounds, I don\'t know what to have my virtual choir actually sing.

    I really love Nick Phoenix\'s music, especially his movie trailers that I
    keep hearing, amazing stuff with his awesome choir sound, but what are they
    actually singing in these pieces? Maybe I just haven\'t listened closely, as
    they usually fly by on TV or in the Theatre, but are they singing some
    profound thoughts, screaming demonic incantations, or simply reciting from
    the phone book?

    Just wondering if singing specific things or maybe singing in Latin is part
    of getting an awesome VOTA sound. I\'m also enjoying Unearthed, by E.S.
    Posthumus, yet once again can\'t really make out what they are singing. My
    guess is Latin. Maybe reciting the phone book in Latin? Is that the trick?

  2. #2

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    A lot of composers actually do that... choose words just because they like the way they sound.

    Others have even been known to use \"wordless vocals\". It sure sounds like they\'re singing words, but it\'s... well, to put it one way, gibberish.

    In the end, ask the client if there\'s anything they particularly want. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    No client here, just composing for fun. I\'ve never been much of a lyricist anyway, so I\'ll try some meaningless gibberish and see how it works out. Just like a lyricist fitting words and vowels to fit music, I can see working with certain vowels and consonants to fit the rhythm and tone of the music, even if it is meaningless vocalizations.

  4. #4

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    There are lots of cool sounding words in latin that really don´t mean much (as mentioned earlier). In \"duel of fates\" John Williams used the word \"frightening battle\" all over again, but it sounds really nice [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] .
    I think someone posted a link to some latin dictionary in the internet a little while ago. My advice is to just browse the words and look for something that sounds what you need.

    Edit: Try Here [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #5

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    I\'ve found that a nice \"secret\" to producing good melodies and rhythms is to \"write for words\". Pick out some phrases and construct a piece around them.

    The syllables just seem to help push out a more original melody and defined rhythm.

  6. #6

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    Originally posted by Rooftop:
    I\'ve found that a nice \"secret\" to producing good melodies and rhythms is to \"write for words\". Pick out some phrases and construct a piece around them.

    The syllables just seem to help push out a more original melody and defined rhythm.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">You too? I use this all the time, It´s a really good trick when I´m stuck with writing!

    Sorry for the double post...

  7. #7

    Re: What are they actually saying?


  8. #8

    Re: What are they actually saying?

    With choral (w/in orch) I have written actual words - relative to the meaning of the music. But I find myself more and more (w/VoTA) \'sculpting\' words to fit the \"rhythm and tone of the music\".

    Particuliarily useful are the consonants accenting a asymetrical rhythm. I like using \'choirs\' to motor the music.

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