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Topic: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

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  1. #1

    A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    Questions in bold have not been fully or at all answered. Each paragraph addresses a seperate question, unless stated otherwise.

    Is there a way to use only one level of velocity regardless of how hard the keys are struck to, for example, simulate an organ?

    Is there a way to associate a sample with a pedal release? How elegant or not the process is, I\'d still like to know. This is for the purpose of simulating the \"thud\" made at the pedal release of a grand piano.

    Does GigaStudio support only forward loops? Or can it also do backward loops, and backward/forward loops?

    Is it possible to strech a single sample over all 128 (or specifically, 88) keys? If not, where can I find something that\'ll explain by how much I\'d need to manually transpose in Cool Edit Pro 2.0 that sample (in hertz, cents, whatever) to achieve a certian note?

    I have Cool Edit Pro 2.0, and would like to know if there\'s a way to find the proper points in a WAV for a natural-sounding loop. It finds beats fairly well, but that\'s not what I\'m looking for. It\'s just that sometimes it\'s hard to find the correct places to create a smooth loop.

    In the LFO1 envelope, when do the events of the sound occur? Below is the picture I\'ve found in the help file. Assuming the sound is a simple tone, with a constant pitch and amplitude, can any of you explain what\'d happen to the sound based on LFO1 values being changed? Also, what exactly takes place when? When do key-off events occur? When do sustain-release events occur? When do pedal-down events occur? And so on.


  2. #2

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    Ill try and answer some of the questions..

    Is there a way to use only one level of velocity regardless of how hard the keys are struck to, for example, simulate an organ?

    On my Roland RD-150 i have a button to swith key sensitivity on and off... Cakewalk Pro Audio and Sonar has a Velocity Scaling feature where you choose the notes you want to alter, write a velocity value and all the notes velocities are changed to whatever value you entered.. Im not sure if Cubase or Logic has that feature..

    Does GigaStudio support only forward loops? Or can it also do backward loops, and backward/forward loops?

    I belive i\'ve converted some akai samples that had backward loops and they sounded fine in giga..
    Not totally sure about this one tough-..

    Is it possible to strech a single sample over all 128 (or specifically, 88) keys? If not, where can I find something that\'ll explain by how much I\'d need to manually transpose in Cool Edit Pro 2.0 that sample (in hertz, cents, whatever) to achieve a certian note?

    Yes in GigaEDIT you can do that.. If you go to Worra\'s Place and download those C64 synths and load one into GigaEDIT im sure you can figure out how to do it.. Or someone with better know-how on this board can explain it [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    I have Cool Edit Pro 2.0, and would like to know if there\'s a way to find the proper points in a WAV for a natural-sounding loop. It finds beats fairly well, but that\'s not what I\'m looking for. It\'s just that sometimes it\'s hard to find the correct places to create a smooth loop.

    This might not be the answer you wanted but ill give it a try.. I use Sound Forge and it has a loop-point-auto-finder thingy [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] works reasonably well, but im sure there are better tools for this out there..

    Hope this was a little helpfull [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    hmmm

    Bold....

    Is there a way to use only one level of velocity regardless of how hard the keys are struck to, for example, simulate an organ?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yes. Set Velocity Response settings to Linear, and Low settings.

    Is there a way to associate a sample with a pedal release? How elegant or not the process is, I\'d still like to know. This is for the purpose of simulating the \"thud\" made at the pedal release of a grand piano.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">not within Giga Studio alone. You can do it with some creative routing in Logic possibly, or Building Blocks. By mapping the \"thud\" to an unsed Key and building an environment/routing set up in Logic/building blocks that triggers the \"thud\" sample when the Sustain pedal moves from 127 to 0 (or whatever values you want)

    Does GigaStudio support only forward loops? Or can it also do backward loops, and backward/forward loops?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">No it does not support multi directional loops at this time. to do this you need to copy/paste/reverse the loop region in and editor. Translating software like Chickensys Translator can do this for you during conversions from different formats.


    Is it possible to strech a single sample over all 128 (or specifically, 88) keys? If not, where can I find something that\'ll explain by how much I\'d need to manually transpose in Cool Edit Pro 2.0 that sample (in hertz, cents, whatever) to achieve a certian note?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yes. Its very simple to do.

    I have Cool Edit Pro 2.0, and would like to know if there\'s a way to find the proper points in a WAV for a natural-sounding loop. It finds beats fairly well, but that\'s not what I\'m looking for. It\'s just that sometimes it\'s hard to find the correct places to create a smooth loop.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Looping short sustaining instruments is an artform unto itself. It would be futile for me to try and explain it here. It can require all sorts of post processing techniques, or none at all. Depending on the sound. Learn to crossfade wisely is all I can say. I use a ton of tools to make good loops. Wavelab, Vegas, Seamless Looper, and soon, possibly Melodyne. Not to mention plug ins for compression, EQ/shelving, and sometimes creating simple sustain tones to layer underneath a sample to \"even\" some loops out.

    In the LFO1 envelope, when do the events of the sound occur? Below is the picture I\'ve found in the help file. Assuming the sound is a simple tone, with a constant pitch and amplitude, can any of you explain what\'d happen to the sound based on LFO1 values being changed? Also, what exactly takes place when? When do key-off events occur? When do sustain-release events occur? When do pedal-down events occur? And so on.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I dont understand this questions really. It seems you are asking about a part of gigastudio that can be too different in too many cases, depending on values and the instrument programmed.

  4. #4

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    I tried to reply last night but NS was down or something. King\'s answered pretty much the same as I did, but here\'s my reply anyway:

    Is there a way to use only one level of velocity regardless of how hard the keys are struck to, for example, simulate an organ?

    Yes, you can set an envelope to ignore velocity by \'going for the two Ls\' on the response tab:
    1. Velocity response set to Linear
    2. Dynamic range set to Low

    Does GigaStudio support only forward loops? Or can it also do backward loops, and backward/forward loops?

    Yes. Giga only does forwards loops. I believe certain conversion programs like Translator get around this by pasting one forward and one reversed loop back to back, then running that as a standard forward loop - which sounds exactly the same [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] It\'s invisible to the user. Pretty cool. Translator will do the same type of manipulation to convert a backwards loop.

    Is it possible to stretch a single sample over all 128 (or specifically, 88) keys? If not, where can I find something that\'ll explain by how much I\'d need to manually transpose in Cool Edit Pro 2.0 that sample (in hertz, cents, whatever) to achieve a certian note?

    Yes you can do this. Just make a region and stretch the sides to cover 128 keys, then make sure the pitch track option is checked in the Mix/Layer page. The sample may not pitch follow for the whole range if you try to stretch it upwards more than a couple of octaves, but slowing down shouldn\'t be a problem.

    I have Cool Edit Pro 2.0, and would like to know if there\'s a way to find the proper points in a WAV for a natural-sounding loop. It finds beats fairly well, but that\'s not what I\'m looking for. It\'s just that sometimes it\'s hard to find the correct places to create a smooth loop.

    Go with Zero X\'s Seamless looper or Wavelab\'s looper. Wavelab has a very nice crossfade loop view/edit function which is hard to beat.

    In the LFO1 envelope, when do the events of the sound occur? Below is the picture I\'ve found in the help file. Assuming the sound is a simple tone, with a constant pitch and amplitude, can any of you explain what\'d happen to the sound based on LFO1 values being changed? Also, what exactly takes place when? When do key-off events occur? When do sustain-release events occur? When do pedal-down events occur? And so on.

    The picture is of an envelope, but not an envelope for an LFO, just an amp or filter envelope. In the case of the amplifier envelope, you are changing volume over time. Hit a key and hold it and the following things happen to the level:

    1. Pre attack level. Opens the amplifier up a certain amount before the envelope attack time even kicks in. This compensates for sounds which have a low initial level. It doesn’t make them louder, but there’s no waiting for the attack time to open the envelope up.

    2. Attack time. A key\'s note-on starts the envelope into its attack phase. The sound rises (normally from 0 level) to maximum volume (100%) at this \'attack\' speed. Large numbers = slow, small numbers = fast. An organ has a fast attack, rubbed wine glasses have a slow attack. Max volume will be conditional on things like velocity and mixer settings.

    3. Hold time. Peculiar to Gigastudio. In an effort to guarantee an easy way to avoid missing out on the portion of a sample which is before a loop, switching on hold causes Giga to play at full level until the sound reaches the loop point (or you let go of the key), at which time the rest of the envelope stages come into effect (or we go to release if you let go of the key). Hold has no affect if there\'s no loop in the sound. This is a very useful feature for older samples which use looping. Generally you want full volume until the dreaded loop appears, so why not have one button that takes care of that for you?

    4. Decay 1. This is another time setting. How long the sound takes to get from maximum level (end of attack time) to the next set level (called sustain).

    5. Sustain. A level control. 100% is maximum level, 0% is no level. Simple organs have a fast attack with a full level sustain, so there\'s no need to worry about the decay time. It\'s irrelevant. Pianos have a fast attack and O% sustain level. Decay time is important in this case. A trumpet might have a quickish attack, quickish decay and variable sustain level. Sustain on most synths is infinite, ie once the envelope reaches this level it will sit there until the key is released. That way you can get out your knives, stab your keyboard, and be Keith Emmerson [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    6. Inf switch. Infinity. Makes the sustain function standardly, as I decribed above - the level just sits there until you release a key.

    7. Decay 2 time. Comes into play ONLY if the \'inf\' switch is OFF. If you turn off infinity, once the envelope reaches the set sustain level, the sound will immediately begin to decay towards 0% level at the decay 2 rate. This allows you to have a double decay - once from full level to that set for sustain, and then again from the sustain level to 0.

    8. Release time. When you let go of a key (or the damper pedal), and the envelope gets a note-off, no matter what stage it\'s in, mid attack, end of decay 1, very low sustain level, whatever, it will go into release. The sound will take whatever time is set in the release window to fall from its current level to 0.

    Pedal down events: generally pedal down events simply tell the synth to ignore the note-offs received after the pedal down event, until the pedal up event is received. I\'m not sure if Giga does anything different here.

  5. #5

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    In answer to one aspect ie:- organ, as King Idiot states, merely set all to linear or non linear and minimum velocity.

    As regards another question namely stretching everything. It would seem that GS has its limits in that beyond a certain point, the shift becomes untenable (as it does in Emu and Akai machines). Sure if you take a sample in the middle range and stretch it down and up there should not be a problem apart from the obvious artificiality of the same but to stretch beyond a 2 - 3 octaves results in a pont where the sample just degenerates into a totally meaningless extension which is unrelated in pitch or any other parameter to the original.

  6. #6

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    Sorry about the duplicate... bloody server keeps cutting me off . Time to move to Broadband I think.

  7. #7

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    Thank you all. Your replies have finally got me to understand what I then did not.

  8. #8

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    posted 08-03-2002 10:34 PM
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Thank you all. Your replies have finally got me to understand what I then did not.
    --------------------
    To know not is to be happy.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Does that mean that now that you know, you are unhappy? Then we have failed!

  9. #9

    Re: A few (very specific) questions about GigaStudio Editor and how to program samples.

    Oh shut up, lol. My signature is generally a seperate thought.

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