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Topic: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

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  1. #1

    Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    This may seem like a bizarre request/question, but I am debating buying a pedal steel and learning it for some country music, or finding a sample library that emulates it fairly nicely. Seeing as it is a complex instrument, I would imagine a sample library would be hard to emulate its sound, but at the same time, I only need to have a few \"runs\" and licks that I could see being able to emulate via midi and a sample library. I will not use pre-recorded licks and runs though.

    The only library I have seen that has one is Bigga Gigga\'s Whole Lotta Country 3. But, I am not sure if I want to invest in a $260 library that would have one sound that could EASILY not do what I would lwant.

    Anyone have any experience with this library or have any advice? Pedal Steel wouldn\'t be hard for me to learn.......just expensive to get into. I don\'t forsee it being a major requirement for me seeing as country music is gravitating away from pedal steel. It is for some upcoming productions that I am doing though.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Originally posted by jkerr:
    This may seem like a bizarre request/question, but I am debating buying a pedal steel and learning it for some country music, or finding a sample library that emulates it fairly nicely. Seeing as it is a complex instrument, I would imagine a sample library would be hard to emulate its sound, but at the same time, I only need to have a few \"runs\" and licks that I could see being able to emulate via midi and a sample library. I will not use pre-recorded licks and runs though.

    The only library I have seen that has one is Bigga Gigga\'s Whole Lotta Country 3. But, I am not sure if I want to invest in a $260 library that would have one sound that could EASILY not do what I would lwant.

    Anyone have any experience with this library or have any advice? Pedal Steel wouldn\'t be hard for me to learn.......just expensive to get into. I don\'t forsee it being a major requirement for me seeing as country music is gravitating away from pedal steel. It is for some upcoming productions that I am doing though.

    Thanks!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Whole Lotta Country is nice, but check out Ilio\'s \"American Heartland\". It\'s got some great bends. It\'s not phrase based, but it does include some interesting phrases. The Akai translates perfectly to Giga.

    Here\'s a tune I did using it and all the sounds (excpet the piano) from American Heartland.

    http://www.sportersstudio.com/Songs/JeepRide.mp3

  3. #3

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    I hadn\'t heard of American Heartland until you mentioned it. I have to say that the harmonica and banjo seem very realistic. The whole demo sounded good, I am just not sure that the pedal steel had the sound I am looking for. It is tough to judge off of that demo. It could...I could run it through amplitube possibly to get the sound I am looking for...

    Thanks for the advice though. I appreciate it. You sold me on American Heartland for the banjo and harmonica sounds... [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  4. #4

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    ---Well, it\'s not as tough as playing a drum set as far as limbic independence. But playing in tune and learning the chords takes time in even one tuning. Yeah, six months sounds about right.

    ---JC


    Originally posted by Sharmy:
    so you want to learn to play pedal steel? hmmm

    A good reality check is in order first.

    Playing pedel steel is doing 4 things at a time. you have a bar....picks on your fingers ...knee levers and pedals....it\'s almost like needing the independence of a drummer while playing a melodic instrument. The projected amout of time needed to play anything in tune is usually about 6 months. It is obviously an amazingly cool instrument...but don\'t expect a few licks to come as easy as playing a guitar.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">

  5. #5

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Did anyone catch that funky band at the Grammy\'s? Man, I wish I could remeber the guy\'s name, but he was playing lap steel within a funk ensemble, and singing at the same time. He was awesome! He was doing leads like I\'ve never heard before....hold on a sec...here, I found him:

    Robert Randolph & the Family Band


    This guy is awesome!!! Totally taking steel guitar to a new level!

  6. #6

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Here\'s a link to his site:

    http://www.robertrandolph.net/


    Craig, if you haven\'t heard this guy you need to check him out!


    Sorry to have hijacked this thread a bit. Now back to the samples!

  7. #7

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Originally posted by jkerr:
    I hadn\'t heard of American Heartland until you mentioned it. I have to say that the harmonica and banjo seem very realistic. The whole demo sounded good, I am just not sure that the pedal steel had the sound I am looking for. It is tough to judge off of that demo. It could...I could run it through amplitube possibly to get the sound I am looking for...

    Thanks for the advice though. I appreciate it. You sold me on American Heartland for the banjo and harmonica sounds... [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">There\'s a lot of stuff on American Heartland. You won\'t regret buying it...you really get a lot for you money.

    I\'ve done some more realistic pieces with the steel, but they are usually in a more \"supporting role\"...this tune I tried to do a lead, and the results do leave a lot to be desired. A nice chord with the pitch wheel can go a long way toward realism if it\'s back in the mix a bit. The more you try to get it out front, the more the limitations show up.

    Good luck!

  8. #8

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Yeah, the steel would be more in the back of the mix...definitely nothing that would need a steel lead.

    Sharmy: I played around with a pedal steel the last time I was up in Nashville and debated on bringing one home. However, the timing wasn\'t right for me then. I agree - it would be very tough to learn, but it is not too far off from playing slide guitar. Those stupid finger picks are what was annoying [img]graemlins/tounge_images/icons/smile.gif[/img] Sure, the knee levers and foot pedals would pose a problem for immediately learning it, but the purpose I would need it for is mainly \"filler\" and deep in the background mix.....nothing that I don\'t think couldn\'t be accomplished while listening to playback and finding the right spots to place the steel. (with a little practice ahead of time).

    Sporter: I would be interested in hearing some other pieces you have - not necessarily the whole piece (as I know that would be a problem), but just a mix or two with some background steel.

    Again, thanks for all the advice so far. And I agree that the steel player in the funk band was on his game. It was different, but cool.

  9. #9

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    Originally posted by jkerr:


    Sporter: I would be interested in hearing some other pieces you have - not necessarily the whole piece (as I know that would be a problem), but just a mix or two with some background steel.

    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Wow, someone asked to hear more of my stuff!! I think that\'s a first. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    On this one I used \"Whole Lotta Country\"..the steel is more in the background with chords and gentle pitch wheel slides. (It\'s a screwy mix...too much reverb)..I probably have a few more as well.

    http://www.sportersstudio.com/Songs/MOT.mp3

    I recently did a gospel project where we used WLC a lot. I\'ll try to get some snippets for you.

    Very educational thread. I always noticed that steel players seem to be in deep concentration...now I know why... [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10

    Re: Pedal Steel Sample Library?

    I have another lesser known library called simply \"Country\" from G-Sound (soundsoneline.com).

    The biggest problem with all of the aforementioned libraries is that they really only give you 3-4 phrases. The moment you\'re starting to get a taste for it, you\'re out of phrases and out of luck.

    For specific instruments like that, you might be better off giving a local country player $50-100 to come in and record what you need.

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