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Topic: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

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  1. #1

    Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Tip of the day......

    When working with the White Grand I, any many of my customers, found out the importancy with setting the velocity curve on your midi keyboard. This is a feature that\'s in many cases are neglected, but if you haven\'t looked into it, you should!
    If you are working with multisampled instruments that have few velocitysplits per notes, it probably doesn\'t matter so much, but since todays multisampled instruments uses more and more velocitysplits, specially pianos, to increase playablitiy and dynamic response, there\'s a lot to be done with tis feature.
    So if you own the White Grand, or any other libray that uses a lot of velocity splits, you should get your manual out and exprimenting with the velocity response for your keyboard. You might be in for a plesent surprise!

  2. #2

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Some old stuff don\'t even transmit all the way to 127. I use a DX7 II FD. It goes 0-100. In Logic a tranformer need to be used, converting incoming 0-100 to out 0-127. I suppose there is tons of other apps doing the same. It\'s just to easy to forget these things.

  3. #3

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Velocity curves are crucial in getting piano samples to sound their best. I use a Yamaha P90 which doesn\'t transmit the higher midi velocities that well, but have now found some software called \'velocity curve\' which allows you to customize your velocity curve.

    http://www.trombettworks.com/velocity.php

    I\'ve found this really useful in bringing out the brighter layers of the White Grand.

  4. #4

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Originally posted by Ed Vance:
    Velocity curves are crucial in getting piano samples to sound their best. I use a Yamaha P90 which doesn\'t transmit the higher midi velocities that well, but have now found some software called \'velocity curve\' which allows you to customize your velocity curve.

    http://www.trombettworks.com/velocity.php

    I\'ve found this really useful in bringing out the brighter layers of the White Grand.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Thanks Ed because I feel not confortable with my Roland A80, even after trying different velocity curves. I will check your program-link.
    I´ll tell you.
    I saw the P90 some days ago and it seems to be a good piano-like controller. The best for me is the Kawai 9500 but anyway we have to go forward with what we own, ...for the moment.

  5. #5

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Originally posted by Hakan Olsson:
    Some old stuff don\'t even transmit all the way to 127. I use a DX7 II FD. It goes 0-100. In Logic a tranformer need to be used, converting incoming 0-100 to out 0-127. I suppose there is tons of other apps doing the same. It\'s just to easy to forget these things.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Okay...you math professors in the audience need to help us out here.

    Don\'t these external velocity curve processors decrease the effective resolution? If the above DX7IIFD example has a range of 0-100, doesn\'t a device that extrapolates that range to 0-127 necessarily divide that range into 100 rather than 127 steps? If so, that could result in some skipped velocity layers in a 16-layer piano sample.

    I picked up a StudioLogic SL-990. The action was good, but I was shocked at how easy it was to reach max velocity, even on steeper curves. I was using a velocity curve processor to squash down some of the upper velocities, but that resulted in coarser upper velocity curve and also did nothing to prevent transmission of velocities at 127. Short of a hard limit, the top of the curve is the top of the curve.

    I\'ve since moved to a Studiologic SL-880, which has a MUCH different action and for me, greater control. Not having to use a velocity curve processor has smoothed out the sound in the PMI Bos 290. The 16 layer patches are very smooth.

    --Eric

  6. #6

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    I just bought a Fatar SL-1100 (the black one, last year\'s model). I found that the velocity curves were very limited when I first got it. At level 3 (the one the manual says gives the full velocity range, I couldn\'t get velocity levels below 20 or above 105. I ended up creating a custom environment in Logic that gives me the full swing of the dynamic range. I believe this is the only sequencer that lets you process MIDI information at the input before recording.

    If anyone\'s interested I have the screenshot of that setup somewhere. I really like the feel of the keyboard, and with a bit of work it\'s become an excellent controller. Mine was broken when I got it -- I bought it for $150 [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] -- so newer ones might not have this problem.

  7. #7

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Originally posted by Eric G:
    Don\'t these external velocity curve processors decrease the effective resolution? If the above DX7IIFD example has a range of 0-100, doesn\'t a device that extrapolates that range to 0-127 necessarily divide that range into 100 rather than 127 steps? If so, that could result in some skipped velocity layers in a 16-layer piano sample.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yes, the resolution will be decreased to 101 steps in a 128 range. So, there are 27 levels I can never hit. Those are evenly spread out from low to high and in my case, by a curve in Logic.

    A 16 layer patch would have 8 levels in a row. I should be able to hit such a layer. If the patch had 128 levels, I wouldn\'t be able to trigger them all. But they would be very very close sounding anyway and the 101 res wouldn\'t make it noticeable.

    /h

  8. #8

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    About Fatar controllers/velocityproblems please look here:

    http://www.northernsounds.com/ubb/NonCGI/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=006681#000000

  9. #9

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Originally posted by Hakan Olsson:
    Some old stuff don\'t even transmit all the way to 127. I use a DX7 II FD. It goes 0-100. In Logic a tranformer need to be used, converting incoming 0-100 to out 0-127.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">This is interesting to me since my keyboard has trouble transmitting higher velocity strikes but it seems to me that just getting Logic to transform it in this way doesn\'t solve the problem elegantly because you will be losing velocity sensitivity, right? Bigger intervals between, say, 56 and 57___98 and 99 etc.

    Actually I don\'t know what I\'m talking about here. Does anyone know if \"transform\" is a good solution or does the sensitivity need to be adjusted at the controller itself?

    Thanks

    Oh, I see I posted this before reading the last few posts. Perhaps the question is already answered.

  10. #10

    Re: Velocity responce curve on your midi keyboard

    Thanks for the link. I essentailly did the same thing as Velomaster does with the Logic environment.

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