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Garritan
08-08-2006, 04:59 PM
......................

Garritan
08-08-2006, 04:59 PM
We are pleased to announce our next guest in the series of Northern Sounds "Meet the Artist" Interviews featuring:


SHAWN CLEMENT
http://www.cakewalk.com/images/artist/ShawnBatman.jpg


Composer Shawn Clement is a well-known film and game composer and one of the biggest names in reality TV, widely credited for helping to establish the tone and style of the genre's sound. Currently, he has scored two upcoming video games, Ubisoft's animated "Open Season," based on Sony Pictures Animation's first feature-length CG animated film (available Sept. 19, ten days prior to the film's Sept. 29 release) , and Disney's "Kim Possible: What's the Switch?". He also wrote scores for the hit games "The Sims 2" and "Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu.

Shawn studied music at the prestigious Berklee College of Music, and moved to Los Angeles and launched his composing career launched soon afterwards. In short time, he was scoring for television shows including some of reality television's first series', "World's Scariest Police Chases," and "World's Wildest Police Videos." As the go-to composer for the reality TV market before anyone knew how successful it would be, Clement is credited with establishing the definitive dramatic musical style of the reality genre and he set the tone for reality TV scores for years to come. In recognition of his definitive style, ASCAP presented Clement with a film and television award for Most Performed Underscore in 2000.

Perhaps Shawn's most notable television series, "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," came in the midst of his reality-television reign. The acclaimed cult series proved that his talent extended beyond the world of reality shows. In addition to scoring the series, he returned to his songwriting days to create several original songs for it. Other television credits include "Queer Eye for the Straight Girl" and "I'm Still Alive." His expansion into film followed, with film credits that include "2004: A Light Knight's Odyssey" (with John Travolta, Samuel Jackson, Christian Slater, Michael York, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Anne Archer and James Earl Jones), "We Married Margo" (Audience Favorite Award winner at the HBO/U.S. Comedy & Arts Festival), and "Last Chance" (Best Original Drama winner at World Fest).


***


It is a privilege to have Shawn as our guest. We are now inviting questions for Shawn from forum members. If you have any questions you would like to ask Shawn about his reality TV or game work, projects he is working on, how he scores, the music business, or have any other questions; now is your opportunity to ask him.

At the end of the questioning period, your questions will be presented to Shawn and we will then post his response in interview form. Please post your questions below or email/PM them to me.

Thank you for your participation.

Let the questions begin!

Leaf
08-08-2006, 05:43 PM
I agree and a privilege to be able to ask questions to such a tremendous talent. Welcome Shawn Clement and congrats for the ASCAP film and television award.

Berklee College of Music is such a great place to have studied, is it possible for you to say what you consider to be the single most important thing you learned while attending there... or what lesson you have found to be the most valuable in your success as an Artist and Composer?

David

LFO
08-08-2006, 07:05 PM
Hello Shawn,
I've watched you name pop up all over the place for the past 8 plus years it seems. Congratulations on such a successful career!

Buffy was an incredible series and a major part of the show was the music. I know Joss Whedon is a musical kind of guy (If you can count `They got the mustard out!' music :) ) and I wondered if he spent more than the usual amount of time on the series music. How involved did he get with you on creating atmosphere, etc.?

With Buffy you could go from horror to comedy in the blink of an eye. Did this create musical challenges for you?

Thanks in advance for any replies!

-Kevin

jcbryson1
08-09-2006, 09:41 AM
Well, where to start? I'm going to jump all over this since composing for media has been my passion for a long time!

1) How did you initially break into scoring scene? Was it through the video game side or did you do some television work first? How did you get your first scoring job?
2) How do you feel that your education at Berklee factored in to what you do now? Did you also make contacts at Berklee that helped you out when you started working?
3) Do you find that you have a preference for either TV or video game work? The reason I ask is that I've read about some of Jeff Rona's experiences regarding the demanding schedules of working on a TV show (I remember him talking about racing to the FedEx office at the last minute to meet deadlines). Do you find either TV or game work more demanding than the other?
4) I'm a little bit familiar with the process that can go into scoring for TV, but have no idea about video games. Could you explain the process? Specifically, I assume there is someone that fills a director type role. Is there any equivalent to a spotting session, where you get to see the game and how it works before you start writing, or is the music typically developed as the game is developed? Is it like writing a library of music for the programmers to choose from to fit the game scenes? I'm very interested in the details of how this all comes together.
5) Do you use essentially the same set of composing tools for all your scoring work? Would you care to tell us about your setup?
6) I don't know if you have a family at home, but do you think this kind of work would place particularly high demands on family life, or do you have a somewhat regular schedule?

I'll stop there for now. I've got lots more questions but want to let others have a chance :D

Thanks to both Gary and Shawn for this opportunity!

Jon Bryson

Prowland
08-09-2006, 09:57 AM
Do you have any tips for someone trying to break into the video game music market? Is it better to apply to a company or work on your own?

Craig Reeves
08-09-2006, 10:37 AM
Hey, can you describe to us where most of your sounds come from when you're doing game music? For instance, what sample libraries do you own? Do you own any Garritan libraries?

Leaf
08-09-2006, 11:39 AM
Next question.

Narator
08-09-2006, 01:44 PM
Hey Composers,

Thank you Gary for this wonderful opportunity!!

I am in love more with his music than his awards. So i will skip the "how did you get in the game" questions and ask him something regarding composition!

1) With which instrument you tweak your melody first? Do you harmonize it before or after? While composing do you play by ear or write music? Which groups of instruments do you do in different situatons(action, tragedy, mystery, romance)?

And i really can not think of anything right now but i will come later and fix these.

Thank you,
Dean Milenkovic

wrayer
08-09-2006, 05:39 PM
Hi Shawn,

I am wondering what instrument is your major instrument: Keyboard, Clarinet, Trumpet, etc.?

What software do you use to realize your score, or, are you a paper and pencil kind of writer?

And, because I am intersted, who did you study composition from or are you self taught? There were some great composers at Berklee

Thank you,

William Rayer

Iplayjazz
08-10-2006, 06:08 PM
Gear Question---- What is your setup, and what do you use as your "go to" sounds/libraries? ex. Strings, piano, drums, ambient.


Thanks

Alan

Melody
08-10-2006, 11:00 PM
I like the music you did on Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu. Can you tell me what was your inspiration. Did you read Batman comic books or see the movie? What helped you to create the mood?

Thank you for taking time to answer our questions.

Justus
08-11-2006, 04:05 AM
Do you begin composing by sketching your ideas into the sequencer on a piano guidetrack or do record the orchestral instruments directly track-by -track?

Atombo
08-14-2006, 03:43 PM
I'm not familiar with Shawn's music, so if anybody has a link where to listen to some of his music, I'd really appreciate it!

Thanks,
Tom

Garritan
08-15-2006, 11:50 AM
I'm not familiar with Shawn's music, so if anybody has a link where to listen to some of his music, I'd really appreciate it!

Here is a link to some of Shawn's music:

http://www.clemistry.com/music.php

etLux
08-18-2006, 01:12 AM
Hi Shawn,

Great to see you at Garritan; and a warm welcome!

Shawn, perhaps you could talk a bit about how newcomers
can gain experience in and entry into the fields of game, film,
and television scoring.

We have many forum members deeply interested in these
areas, and I know they would find your comments in this
regard of much help.

My best,

David
www.DavidSosnowski.com
.

SeanHannifin
08-18-2006, 01:37 AM
Howdy Shawn! :)

Do you find that you tend to use some kind of certain compositional process often when working on projects, or does the process you go through always change for each project?

Also, what kind of information do directors/guys-in-charge tend to give you regarding what they want? Do you prefer them to be specific about what they want in the music, or do you prefer to have more artistic say yourself in what you compose?

Lastly... just curious... any funny memories from your job? Any anecdote(s)? :o :D

Thank you for your time! :)

Narator
08-18-2006, 06:42 AM
Q for Gary.

When/where is this interview going to be done?

Q for Shawn.

do you work out?

Looper
08-21-2006, 05:31 PM
Shawn,

Please tell us how you broke into the business after leaving Berklee and moving to LA? Did you work as a performing musician while pursuing scoring work or did get into scoring right away?

Thanks for sharing with the group.

EDIT:

Since asking that 2nd question I've read on your website that you were a top guitarist before getting into scoring.

Please allow me to ask a different question; how did you develop such incredible orchestration technique when the libraries and virtuals instruments we rely on today weren't available when you were starting out in the early to mid 90's?

Brian

James W.G. Smith
08-22-2006, 05:32 PM
I have noticed one of the prominent tools used in television scoring by some composers is musical and/or rhythmic loops. How do you feel using this effects originality in a score, most importantly when the loops where not written by the composer using them?

Have you ever had to face composing for an hour-long show in a very short timeframe? If so, how did you deal with the kind of pressure and stress that can come from a contract like that?

When initially starting a new project, what is your process in trying to find an original sound for it?

What is your favorite cue that you have written?

What is your favorite color?

What is your favorite cue that you haven't written?

Would you be willing to share something thing that you have learned concerning film scoring that you did not learn in college?

What are your goals as a film composer? Any dream projects that you would love to be involved in?

What was the most difficult moment of your career, and if they are separate, the most rewarding?

What are some of the challenges about scoring a game as opposed to a film or television show?

And finally, the most important question: What kind of socks are you wearing?

Man, I think I ask too many questions...

James

bbybeaniej
08-23-2006, 08:44 PM
What advice would you give to someone getting started in the business?

Thanks!

Craig Reeves
08-30-2006, 04:35 AM
I am not sure whether or not you get this question alot, but here goes...

We all know how many oppurtunities composing professionally can do for your professional life, but does composing professionally allow you oppurtunities in your social life as well? Does it allow you to meet new and interesting people and actually make friends with them (like, hang out outside of work)?

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:13 PM
Hello Shawn,
I've watched you name pop up all over the place for the past 8 plus years it seems. Congratulations on such a successful career!

Buffy was an incredible series and a major part of the show was the music. I know Joss Whedon is a musical kind of guy (If you can count `They got the mustard out!' music :) ) and I wondered if he spent more than the usual amount of time on the series music. How involved did he get with you on creating atmosphere, etc.?

With Buffy you could go from horror to comedy in the blink of an eye. Did this create musical challenges for you?

Thanks in advance for any replies!

-Kevin

Working with Joss was really easy. We'd literally spot the show and he would say 'go.' The thing about Joss is that, when he hires you, he trusts what you do. He would spot and tell me when to make it scary. Every so often, he'd call in the middle of the night with an idea, but I rarely had to change music. It's wasn't about cues not working, but about him wanting to be featuresque.

No, it didn't create challenges. I get bored really easy and like jumping from style to style, so for me it's better working that way.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:15 PM
Do you have any tips for someone trying to break into the video game music market? Is it better to apply to a company or work on your own?

No matter what part of the scoring business you want to get in, it's all based on relationships. When you apply for a company, you could get lost. The idea is to meet the individual producers and those involved with it, so going to a GDC or E3 is the best way to go. You want to really meet these people, get to know them and get them to listen to your music. Perseverence, perseverence. If they hire you, kick ~~~ and do a good job.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:17 PM
Hey, can you describe to us where most of your sounds come from when you're doing game music? For instance, what sample libraries do you own? Do you own any Garritan libraries?

I have almost every library you can possibly get. I have a lot of custom stuff and I tweak a lot of the stuff you can buy. However, I do want to say the Garritan string library is the best you can buy. I use it all the time. When possible, I try to employ live stuff in with that. It's the combination of multiple elements that give me my sound.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:20 PM
Hey Composers,

Thank you Gary for this wonderful opportunity!!

I am in love more with his music than his awards. So i will skip the "how did you get in the game" questions and ask him something regarding composition!

1) With which instrument you tweak your melody first? Do you harmonize it before or after? While composing do you play by ear or write music? Which groups of instruments do you do in different situatons(action, tragedy, mystery, romance)?

And i really can not think of anything right now but i will come later and fix these.

Thank you,
Dean Milenkovic

Every piece of music is different, but when I write, I write it all at the same time. When I write a cue, I hear all the parts at the same time. Every cue has a different process. What hits me first may be a groove or a rhythm. There's no set method other than that I write it all at the same time.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:24 PM
Hi Shawn,

I am wondering what instrument is your major instrument: Keyboard, Clarinet, Trumpet, etc.?



What software do you use to realize your score, or, are you a paper and pencil kind of writer?


And, because I am intersted, who did you study composition from or are you self taught? There were some great composers at Berklee



Thank you,

William Rayer

Guitar and keyboards.

Because of the nature of the gigs I do, I use Cakewalk/Sonar to write. I could be a paper and pencil kind of writer, but that's not the world we live in. I've been using this software for about 10 years.
I took private guitar lessons since I was 12 and went to Berklee for about 2 years. I didn't major in anything. For composition, I'm self taught. So, to answer you more directly, I have a combination of the two. You have to teach yourself to write.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:28 PM
Gear Question---- What is your setup, and what do you use as your "go to" sounds/libraries? ex. Strings, piano, drums, ambient.


Thanks

Alan

There are no go to sounds, per se, because they change for the cue that I'm writing. A lot of composers may have a set up for different cues, but I don't do that. I'm very cue specific. I start from scratch every time which gives me diversity.

As far as my set-up, I'm PC based. I have three Giga Studios, 2 Akai S-6000, 2 E4s, a Kurzweil K2500, an E2 -- these are my main things. I also have a slew of other stuff that I can use at my disposal. For mixing, I have 3 Yamaha O2R's syched together and a Mackie 1604 submixer.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:30 PM
I like the music you did on Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu. Can you tell me what was your inspiration. Did you read Batman comic books or see the movie? What helped you to create the mood?

Thank you for taking time to answer our questions.

I've never read a Batman comic book in my life. That was the second of two Batman games I did. On this game, they wanted to bring elements of the film to the score. And, of course, I'd seen the movie. The first one, "Batman: Vengence," they wanted a completely new Batman. They didn't want me to watch the movie.

They wanted me to referrence the Danny Elfman music in the second one, but they brought in a remixer to remix my music from the first one in the game play.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:32 PM
Do you begin composing by sketching your ideas into the sequencer on a piano guidetrack or do record the orchestral instruments directly track-by -track?

Depends on the project. it depends on whether you have live player. I don't sketch. I just start writing. Watch it and write the first thing that comes into my head. It's very improvisational.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:35 PM
Hi Shawn,

Great to see you at Garritan; and a warm welcome!

Shawn, perhaps you could talk a bit about how newcomers
can gain experience in and entry into the fields of game, film,
and television scoring.

We have many forum members deeply interested in these
areas, and I know they would find your comments in this
regard of much help.

My best,

David
www.DavidSosnowski.com (http://www.DavidSosnowski.com)
.

You can go and try to apprentice for another composer. I never did that and always kick myself. You can learn a lot and that's one way to really get a hands on what's going on.

Try to do student films, short films. Give yourself deadlines and write a cue every day. Write in a different style every time you do something. Score the same scene six times.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:39 PM
Howdy Shawn! :)

Do you find that you tend to use some kind of certain compositional process often when working on projects, or does the process you go through always change for each project?

Also, what kind of information do directors/guys-in-charge tend to give you regarding what they want? Do you prefer them to be specific about what they want in the music, or do you prefer to have more artistic say yourself in what you compose?

Lastly... just curious... any funny memories from your job? Any anecdote(s)? :o :D

Thank you for your time! :)

The process changes every time.

I like to get as much information as possible about what they like. Although you always want to bring your artistic vision, you want to satisfy the person who hired you. I like having temp scores. I like finding out what the person really likes so I can get it the first time. I very rarely have to do a rewrite. Having said that, every director has their own process. I've done shows where they give me no information at all. I love those gigs.

No funny anecdotes I can put into print.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:41 PM
I am not sure whether or not you get this question alot, but here goes...

We all know how many oppurtunities composing professionally can do for your professional life, but does composing professionally allow you oppurtunities in your social life as well? Does it allow you to meet new and interesting people and actually make friends with them (like, hang out outside of work)?

It's like any job. You get to know other people. You get invited to awards shows so it's a business/social event. It's like anything. You meet the people you meet.

For composers, we come in at the end and those people aren't around. You get out of it what you get out of it.

Shawn Clement
09-12-2006, 07:42 PM
Q for Gary.

When/where is this interview going to be done?

Q for Shawn.

do you work out?


Absolutely not!

CallMeZoot
09-12-2006, 10:04 PM
Hey Shawn, I wrote you an email back in 1997 or so, when I was a freshman composition major in college (I think I got your email address from a Cakewalk 5.0 Demo). You wrote back with a very thoughtful and helpful list of tips and advice. Many thanks for taking the time to help a kid out...

chris.

Drumroll
09-12-2006, 11:53 PM
First, a hearty welcome and thank you for taking the time to devote to our queries.

Second, thank you so much to you and Gary for agreeing to this format. After reading your responses to our forum posts, it seems that you are able to really address the individuals in the group.

And now for my question...

I am in mid-life crisis and considering attending graduate school for my masters. You addressed a little of your educational background verses your networking success and if possible, I would like you to expand on how much your education in music helps verses your networking. On your resume, does "Berklee" or "Buffy" get you further or the personal contact (which you can't pay money for.) Would you recommend that I just really work on my networking skills to get my media "out there" or would you say that a masters degree has great clout, and with a solid portfolio, would get me the gig.

I ask this because I am looking at coughing up between $16K and $40K for graduate school/certificate and would rather put the money to a better cause. I know that some would say that I am comparing apples to oranges because a masters may give me access to other opportunities, but not necessarily the opportunities that I prefer (tho not bad ones....)

Anyways, please excuse my ramblings. I hope you have enough time to even address my post.

Thank you so much for contributing to the Garritan forum. It is certainly a pleasure to read about your industry experiences.

Best,
~Paula

Shawn Clement
09-13-2006, 05:11 PM
Well, where to start? I'm going to jump all over this since composing for media has been my passion for a long time!

1) How did you initially break into scoring scene? Was it through the video game side or did you do some television work first? How did you get your first scoring job?
2) How do you feel that your education at Berklee factored in to what you do now? Did you also make contacts at Berklee that helped you out when you started working?
3) Do you find that you have a preference for either TV or video game work? The reason I ask is that I've read about some of Jeff Rona's experiences regarding the demanding schedules of working on a TV show (I remember him talking about racing to the FedEx office at the last minute to meet deadlines). Do you find either TV or game work more demanding than the other?
4) I'm a little bit familiar with the process that can go into scoring for TV, but have no idea about video games. Could you explain the process? Specifically, I assume there is someone that fills a director type role. Is there any equivalent to a spotting session, where you get to see the game and how it works before you start writing, or is the music typically developed as the game is developed? Is it like writing a library of music for the programmers to choose from to fit the game scenes? I'm very interested in the details of how this all comes together.
5) Do you use essentially the same set of composing tools for all your scoring work? Would you care to tell us about your setup?
6) I don't know if you have a family at home, but do you think this kind of work would place particularly high demands on family life, or do you have a somewhat regular schedule?

I'll stop there for now. I've got lots more questions but want to let others have a chance :D

Thanks to both Gary and Shawn for this opportunity!

Jon Bryson

1. When I came into town, I was playing in a country band. The singer was an actress and model so she knew all types of Hollywood people. I met many of them and ended up working on the Wonder Years as a grunt. I ended up doing videos and ended up working in the mail room at Sony Pictures. I went to a lot of events, did a lot of schmoozing and eventually got a low-budget indie film. It went from there.

2. The second part, the answer is no. The more you learn about your craft, the more it helps.

3. that's a good questions. Overall, I think TV is the hardest thing you can do. Having said that, some elements of game recording is very demanding as well. My overall preference is actually film. They all have their good and bad points.

4. I think I answered this one a little higher up the thread.

5. Ditto. A little further up the thread.

6. It's extremely difficult to have a relationship of any sort because they whole industry takes up so much of your time and lifestyle. the other people in your family have to always know that the job comes first and that's not easy for people to take.

Shawn Clement
09-13-2006, 05:12 PM
Hey Shawn, I wrote you an email back in 1997 or so, when I was a freshman composition major in college (I think I got your email address from a Cakewalk 5.0 Demo). You wrote back with a very thoughtful and helpful list of tips and advice. Many thanks for taking the time to help a kid out...

chris.

You are welcome!

Shawn Clement
09-13-2006, 05:15 PM
First, a hearty welcome and thank you for taking the time to devote to our queries.

Second, thank you so much to you and Gary for agreeing to this format. After reading your responses to our forum posts, it seems that you are able to really address the individuals in the group.

And now for my question...

I am in mid-life crisis and considering attending graduate school for my masters. You addressed a little of your educational background verses your networking success and if possible, I would like you to expand on how much your education in music helps verses your networking. On your resume, does "Berklee" or "Buffy" get you further or the personal contact (which you can't pay money for.) Would you recommend that I just really work on my networking skills to get my media "out there" or would you say that a masters degree has great clout, and with a solid portfolio, would get me the gig.

I ask this because I am looking at coughing up between $16K and $40K for graduate school/certificate and would rather put the money to a better cause. I know that some would say that I am comparing apples to oranges because a masters may give me access to other opportunities, but not necessarily the opportunities that I prefer (tho not bad ones....)

Anyways, please excuse my ramblings. I hope you have enough time to even address my post.

Thank you so much for contributing to the Garritan forum. It is certainly a pleasure to read about your industry experiences.

Best,
~Paula

Networking will get you the jobs. That's what gets you hired and, ultimately, that is the goal. The only thing a degree would do is if you wanted a teaching position.

Shawn Clement
09-13-2006, 05:18 PM
Shawn,

Please tell us how you broke into the business after leaving Berklee and moving to LA? Did you work as a performing musician while pursuing scoring work or did get into scoring right away?

Thanks for sharing with the group.

EDIT:

Since asking that 2nd question I've read on your website that you were a top guitarist before getting into scoring.

Please allow me to ask a different question; how did you develop such incredible orchestration technique when the libraries and virtuals instruments we rely on today weren't available when you were starting out in the early to mid 90's?

Brian

I think I've addressed your first part elsewhere.

I've always used the tools that were avaialble. I didn't study orchestration at all in school. It's about listening and trying to mimic what I've heard with the tools available. I do the best I can.

Shawn Clement
09-13-2006, 05:27 PM
I have noticed one of the prominent tools used in television scoring by some composers is musical and/or rhythmic loops. How do you feel using this effects originality in a score, most importantly when the loops where not written by the composer using them?

Have you ever had to face composing for an hour-long show in a very short timeframe? If so, how did you deal with the kind of pressure and stress that can come from a contract like that?

When initially starting a new project, what is your process in trying to find an original sound for it?

What is your favorite cue that you have written?

What is your favorite color?

What is your favorite cue that you haven't written?

Would you be willing to share something thing that you have learned concerning film scoring that you did not learn in college?

What are your goals as a film composer? Any dream projects that you would love to be involved in?

What was the most difficult moment of your career, and if they are separate, the most rewarding?

What are some of the challenges about scoring a game as opposed to a film or television show?

And finally, the most important question: What kind of socks are you wearing?

Man, I think I ask too many questions...

James

Loops are fine to use. It all depends on what you do with them. If you use your creativity to do something different, I don't have a problem with it. I have a problem with using a loop all by itself. It's an enhancement to your cue, not a main element.

I kick and I scream. You always get short time. You look at the time you have and regiment it out. You just make it happen and you work fast. Focus and deliver. It's always stressful no matter how much you've done it.

I think we answered this one earlier.

I don't have one. I've written thousands of pieces of music and they're all my children.

I'm color blind.

I don't know how to answer that. How about the Star Wars theme? I wish I'd written that.

everything.

Everyone's goals are to do bigger and better films.

The most rewarding has been the realization that I can actually do this. Everyone wants to be a composer, but not everyone can pull it off. the most frustrating part is getting the job and doing the politics. It's not like other jobs where if you do good they reward you. This does not work the way other businesses work.

We kind of answered that already. Please check the thread.

White ones.

Garritan
09-16-2006, 08:17 PM
WALK ON THE WILD SIDE: FILM COMPOSER SHAWN CLEMENT
SCORES "OPEN SEASON" - Available SEPT 19


(Hollywood,CA) Composer Shawn Clement provides the score to the much-anticipated release for Ubisoft's "Open Season," based on Sony Pictures Animation's first feature-length CG animated film. Ubisoft releases the game on all available platforms Sept. 19, ten days prior to the film's Sept. 29 release.


"I'd never been asked to provide a lot of country music," says Clement, who nevertheless created some 250 tracks for the hillbilly-infused score. The composer played all the guitar parts including dobro and lap steel. Clement also got his banjo chops together, playing both traditional 5-string and a specially created 6-string banjo. "Gold Tone made that for me," says Clement. "It looks like a Fender Telecaster with a big drum head in the center."


Each character is associated with a particular sound. Boog, the bear lured into leaving the comforts of home, is represented by bass guitar. Harmonica, banjo and melodica bring Elliot, the fast-talking mule deer, to life. Full orchestra adds excitement to the game's action sequences.


Known for his scores to hit games "The Sims 2" and "Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu," Clement follows "Open Season" with a more traditional, synth-based score to Buena Vista Games' "Kim Possible: What's the Switch?" This fifth issue in the Kim Possible series based on the hit animated TV show comes to PlayStation 2 on Nov. 11.
As the go-to composer for the reality TV market before anyone knew how successful it would be, Clement is credited with establishing the definitive dramatic musical style of the reality genre. In recognition, ASCAP presented Clement with a film and television award for Most Performed Underscore in 2000.


A multifaceted composer, Shawn's film credits include 2004: A Light Knight's Odyssey (with John Travolta, Samuel Jackson, Christian Slater, Michael York, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Anne Archer and James Earl Jones), We Married Margo (Audience Favorite Award winner at the HBO/U.S. Comedy & Arts Festival), and Last Chance (Best Original Drama winner at World Fest). He has also scored such television series as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Queer Eye for the Straight Girl, and I'm Still Alive.
For interviews and photos, contact Costa Communications, 323-650-3588

Leaf
02-03-2007, 04:26 PM
I had forgot about this section of the forum, glad i was clicking around. Thanks for giving the interview and thanks to you, Shawn Clements, for sharing your thoughts and insight. Hope you have continued great success and looking forward to next tme.:samurai:

Best Regards
David