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Frederick
04-18-2005, 11:10 AM
Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System? A little off the beaten path but nonetheless valid as well, since it is being taught in some colleges from what I've heard.

www.equalinterval.com (http://www.equalinterval.com)

Peace,

Frederick

Joseph Burrell
04-18-2005, 11:19 AM
Not a bad idea Frederick. This teaching style is very interesting and is gaining momentum. I'm not aware of any instructors using this method at present, but its something to look into.

JohnnyP
04-18-2005, 12:51 PM
Hey Hey hey!


Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System?
I just checked the list of graduates and our own Craig Sharmat (http://www.equalinterval.com/testimonials.htm#cs) is listed.

Sincerley,

Jonathan

Garritan
04-18-2005, 01:26 PM
Will there be any representatives/instructors here from Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System? A little off the beaten path but nonetheless valid as well, since it is being taught in some colleges from what I've heard.

www.equalinterval.com (http://www.equalinterval.com)

Peace,

Frederick

Excellent suggestion Frederick. I think it would be a good idea to have an instructor for Lyle Murphy's Equal Interval System. Anyone you can think of?

Gary Garritan

JohnnyP
04-18-2005, 02:20 PM
Well I just got through listening to ALL the demos at the site. I think I like the jazz stuff better than the orchestration BUT the orchestration is pretty tight.

Not only is Craig there with a testimonial, I found a lot of composers writing for animation I watch on tv now. I loved the power puff girls, and Dexter, and Star Wars Clone Wars. Well the composers for those programs are all EIS grads!

Makes me think EIS course $300 + GPO $250. Some knowledge and tools! Might pass the time while I consider a day job and grad school.

Sincerely,

Jonathan

Tom Hopkins
04-18-2005, 07:22 PM
I'm glad Craig, Frederick, and others are spreading the word on Spud Murphy. Spud is a remarkable guy with a fascinating slant on music theory. I personally find the results (as evidenced by Spud's and his students' music) extremely attractive. I hope EIS will be represented in some form here.

Tom

scottnorma
04-19-2005, 03:01 AM
If the audio samples posted at the site are any indication of what this system will turn you into, I'd recommend keeping as far away from it as you possibly can. Yet another gimmicky "system" of dubious merit. Just what the world needed.

Tom Hopkins
04-19-2005, 04:49 AM
Well Scott,

To each his own, of course, but to dismiss an approach that appears to have contributed to such disparate examples as Mary Eklerís gorgeous re-harmonizations, Craig Sharmatís intricate and harmonically fascinating (to me at least) arrangements, Bennie Maupinís high quality Ė as always - jazz, and Tim Torranceís clever and fun Officer Gadget is rather . . . sweeping. Thatís a lot of territory. Whatever, I would encourage people to investigate further if they hear things of interest to them in the examples above and others. If not, they should look elsewhere. This is another choice among many. I just happen to like what I hear in much of this. As nearly always, it comes down to nothing more than personal preference Ė not an absolute in sight.

Tom

P.S. Thanks Sharmy, for generously offering to answer questions as they arise. I hope anyone interested takes the opportunity to ask. Sharmy is well-versed in EIS (something Iím not) and would be a great source of information.

jesshmusic
04-19-2005, 06:47 AM
No system should be used as the sole means of composition. So I partially agree with Scott. But, it could be another tool. I will say that there are no short cuts in music. If one wants to be a great composer there is no way around doing the hard work, studying scores, scales, orchestration books galore, college (or conservatory or even just private tutoring). Remember, if it is too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true. :)

JohnnyP
04-19-2005, 08:53 AM
I see where Scott is coming from BUT I do feel there's some variety in the writing. Like I said a lot of the animation I do enjoy on cartoon network is written by folks who seem versed in this method.

Now, I'm a vain music film fashion victim and I IMDB a lot of those folks and I was very impressed.

Jess, you my man, and I agree that as with other crafts and arts that: 'There are no short cuts.' But I don't think this is a short cut. I mean somewhere on the site it said it takes about 2 years to do all the stuff.

Also, and Craig says this, sounds like alot of people already had lots of playing experience and a degree before studying this method. I don't see anything that says no need to know music.

I mean, I want to study the string quartet course that pete offers at his web site. It's a method and an approach. Funny, just last night I was at home trying to find a Bach piece from Well Tempered Clavier and off my shelf fell some Old Suzuki method books, and a Hannon, and Kodali(?). All methods to start and train someone in piano proficiency. A method.

Also, the theory being expressed reminds me of something a theory teacher I had in college did. His background was big band arranging and he used what he called 'Miracle Voicings?'

Sincerely,

Jonathan

JohnnyP
04-19-2005, 10:11 AM
Craig,


It says the course can be finished in 2 years. I think that is highly optimistic marketing. It may have happened, but in my 10 years or so of witnessing the course, I have seen people graduate in 4 years and no sooner.

http://www.northernsounds.com/forum/images/smilies/eek.gif Dannnnnnnnnnnngggggg!
Could you elaborate a little more? I didn't see any course outlined at the website because when I checked it wasn't up yet. A few composers say, 'I'm using this method from this section blah blah blah.' Can you give a little breakdown or overview on concepts or materials?


As far as it being the same as any other method out there, it is not possible. there are of course similarities at points with other methods, but it goes off on it's own in a way only it can.
No sweat, I wasn't sure. I mean I probably had this class like 12 years ago. Craig what's your background? degree? Hard knocks? I ask not out of judgement but to inquire on how the course beniftis you. I love the things I've heard you write, especially your jazz guitar stuff.

Sincerely,

Jonathan

JohnnyP
04-19-2005, 11:21 AM
Craig,


Thanks for asking,

first did you see this page?

http://www.equalinterval.com/about_EIS.htm

the course comes in 12 books. lessons can be done through email or live over the internet one on one with a live instuctor.


Oh I'm sorry, I did see that but made very light of it. I was thinking there were some books or something. I'll review it in more depth. Are the instructors included in the cost of $300?

Thanks for sharing your background.

Sincerley,

Jonathan

Garritan
04-19-2005, 03:58 PM
I was very impressed with some of the examples on the site. That is very good of you Sharmy to offer you help. Much appreciated.

Gary Garritan

Styxx
04-19-2005, 06:35 PM
Remind me not to click on that one again! Looked interesting but acrobat reader went nuts opening several hundred times then freezing everything! Woa! I was freaking out trying to get it to stabilize!
Did a full up to date virus scan and beats me?

Frederick
04-19-2005, 10:40 PM
I was very impressed with some of the examples on the site. That is very good of you Sharmy to offer you help. Much appreciated.

Gary Garritan

Sharmy is a great teacher. I'm a student of EIS and taking lessons from him. In the short time I've been involved in the course, EIS has been slowly integrating into virtually everything I do compositionally now even with my limited knowledge of it. It's not really magic, it won't slice, dice, puree or do your wash (as always you yourself are responsible for the outcome). But I've heard composers improve virtually overnight using elements of the course - even early in the course.

Thanks Gary for your open-mindedness regarding this idea and to the fine community here.

Best,

Frederick

Joseph Burrell
04-19-2005, 10:43 PM
I just wish I had the time for something like this. I'm overworked and have no spare time. :mad:

Frederick
04-19-2005, 11:19 PM
Hey Joseph,

So am I - ask Sharmy. I go at my own pace - a snail's crawl for the most part and occasionally fast but hey, I also live in the real world with heavy schedules as well. My suggestion to anybody interested in it is to try Lesson 1, complete the assignment at your own speed and see what you think. My hunch is that afterwards most will begin yearning for lesson 2, and then when the compositional doors to the imagination start swinging wide due to EIS principles then you're hooked.

Peace,

Frederick

Joseph Burrell
04-19-2005, 11:27 PM
That's good news. Sharmy says 4 years, you could bet on me taking about 2 decades considering the time I'd have to devote to it. :p

I might just order the first lesson and see what happens.

Tangram
04-26-2005, 04:05 AM
Hi Jonathan,

the $300 is for the entire course materials. Instructors are needed with the course and are extra. I do not suggest buying the whole course up front. not only is sitting with 4 years of study in front of you a little daunting but I feel a needless expense until you are happy with how you are progressing through the course. You can buy the first 2 books for some where around $40.00 and it will take a half year to get through. At that point you can decide if the course is working for you. Lessons are approximitaly 1 hr including homework review. Lessons are between $55-65 depending on instructor. There may become a common price set soon.

Hope this helps

Craig

As I can see it, it's not possible to order at that website.
"Order Now" is work in progress!
How to order??

/Mats

Steve_Karl
01-22-2007, 12:33 PM
As I can see it, it's not possible to order at that website.
"Order Now" is work in progress!
How to order??

/Mats

I suspect what needs to be done is to email one of the teachers.
http://www.equalinterval.com/teachers.htm




.

gregjazz
01-23-2007, 07:17 PM
I haven't taken EIS, but I've done a lot of research on it, and it seems like a very practical, viable look on harmony and arranging that is compatible with traditional perspectives.

Garritan
01-23-2007, 11:44 PM
The EIS system is excellent and is also something worth considering. I will look into it further and see if and how we can offer something here.

In the meantime we are working on a course in Jazz Arranging based on Chuck Israel's new boork "Exploring Jazz Arranging".

Gary Garritan

jackull
01-24-2007, 11:29 AM
NSS leads me to EiS subject since I became a member here. I've been studying eis now for more than a year(on & off) & it's been a great compositional & arranging tool afaik. It'll open up a whole new musical vocabulary you've never imagine. Like in any other musical practices, we all need to be persistent in order to realize the full potential of its subject matter. It took me a while to fully understand the eis concept. And even then, there are a lot more useful ideas that needs to be unlock. Even the graduates themselves would still discover new useful stuff in it. I still got 2 more books left on the course & it would probably take me another year or more to finish it. That means more day jobs :)

Here's an example I'd like to share;

G Step (http://www.splitoctave.com/shorts/G_Steps.mp3)

It's an eis re-harm of the Coltrane Giant Steps. BTW, I use Bela D's LD1/2 guitars for melody line.

cheers,
jackULL

Stamak
01-24-2007, 06:19 PM
In the meantime we are working on a course in Jazz Arranging based on Chuck Israel's new boork "Exploring Jazz Arranging".

Gary Garritan[/QUOTE]


Hallo Gary,

Will this Chuck Israels' book be available for purchase at some point in time??

Regards Stamak

Garritan
01-25-2007, 08:17 AM
Hallo Gary,

Will this Chuck Israels' book be available for purchase at some point in time??

Regards StamakHi Stamek,

Yes, Chuck's book will be available for purchase at some point. The book itself is done and we are working on realizing the examples in the book. We are thinking of having a course on the forum. We are working out the details and should know something more definitive soon.


http://www.garritan.com/JABB/Jazz_cover.jpg

Garritan
01-25-2007, 08:52 AM
jackull,

Excellent work on the EIS re-harmonization of Giant Steps! )(~ You have done good work with this jazz classic. Thanks for sharing it and telling us about your experience with EIS.

Gary Garritan


NSS leads me to EiS subject since I became a member here. I've been studying eis now for more than a year(on & off) & it's been a great compositional & arranging tool afaik. It'll open up a whole new musical vocabulary you've never imagine. Like in any other musical practices, we all need to be persistent in order to realize the full potential of its subject matter. It took me a while to fully understand the eis concept. And even then, there are a lot more useful ideas that needs to be unlock. Even the graduates themselves would still discover new useful stuff in it. I still got 2 more books left on the course & it would probably take me another year or more to finish it. That means more day jobs :)

Here's an example I'd like to share;

G Step (http://www.splitoctave.com/shorts/G_Steps.mp3)

It's an eis re-harm of the Coltrane Giant Steps. BTW, I use Bela D's LD1/2 guitars for melody line.

cheers,
jackULL

Stamak
01-26-2007, 05:16 AM
Hi Stamek,

Yes, Chuck's book will be available for purchase at some point. The book itself is done and we are working on realizing the examples in the book. We are thinking of having a course on the forum. We are working out the details and should know something more definitive soon.


http://www.garritan.com/JABB/Jazz_cover.jpg


Hi Gary,
This sounds great!! The idea of the jazz arranging course is great for
people like me who work with the JBB Library. I look forward to seeing and hearing the results of your work.

The orchestration course was superb and very well laid out with the scores/sound examples. A question- you mentioned at some point a while back that the course would available for purchase as a DVD. Is that still the case??
That is so much material that constant referral to it is necessary.

Thanks once again for your never-ending flow!!

Regards Stamak

richardjay
04-29-2007, 10:14 AM
I mean, I want to study the string quartet course that pete offers at his web site. It's a method and an approach.

This is probably really bad netiquette, replying to something from two years ago, but who is Pete and where can I find his website ?? A string quartet course sounds very interesting to me ....

Hope someone can remember :)

JohnnyP
04-30-2007, 01:08 PM
This is probably really bad netiquette, replying to something from two years ago, but who is Pete and where can I find his website ?? A string quartet course sounds very interesting to me ....

Hope someone can remember :)
Oh, yeah I saw this thread pop up and was like what? I was referring to Pete Alexander and one of his many 'Living Composers?' series.

dewdman42
05-18-2007, 07:20 PM
I would be very interested to learn more about EIS. A couple years ago I looked into it a little bit, but the entire course is kind of expensive to get all the books, and I decided I have enough materials to study now as it is. Perhaps down the road.

It seems that the only way to obtain the books is to get them from an EIS teacher and to basically study from the teacher as you go. For a price of course. In some ways, the pricing is about on par with The Dick Grove stuff.

In my view this means that the people that already know EIS or Dick Grove's theories are basically carefully guarding their knowledge so that they can make money through instruction. They are certainly entitled to do that, but the price is a bit high for me to go any deeper with it.

if anyone wants to sell me their used EIS books, I might consider it though.

billval3
05-25-2007, 05:24 PM
I would be very interested to learn more about EIS. A couple years ago I looked into it a little bit, but the entire course is kind of expensive to get all the books, and I decided I have enough materials to study now as it is. Perhaps down the road.

It seems that the only way to obtain the books is to get them from an EIS teacher and to basically study from the teacher as you go. For a price of course. In some ways, the pricing is about on par with The Dick Grove stuff.

In my view this means that the people that already know EIS or Dick Grove's theories are basically carefully guarding their knowledge so that they can make money through instruction. They are certainly entitled to do that, but the price is a bit high for me to go any deeper with it.

if anyone wants to sell me their used EIS books, I might consider it though.

Same here. Like you said, they are entitled to do what they're doing, but I don't see how they could ban people from selling the texts when they're done with them. Sorry if I sound like a bad person for saying that, I just believe in a free exchange of ideas and knowledge. Nothing worng with selling books, but this system seems "iffy" to me.