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View Full Version : It's Guess The Composer Time



Nicole
07-23-2004, 10:25 AM
I ran across this CD a few weeks ago of pieces I never heard from this famous composer. I searched everywhere for the score for one particular piece. I finally found it(once again funny how the CD interpretation is a bit different then whats written!). There are no midi files anywhere of this work. I started the piece in GPO by just inputing the notes in sonar so its rough, however this is onlly a segment. I didnt record certain parts(the segment before the fugue and the ending) else im afraid it will give it away as to who did this. Its a segment but nearly approaches the end(the end makes a dead give away imo so im leaving it out). happy guessing, well unless you have heard this before!

http://home.cfl.rr.com/delly/GPO%20guess%20the%20composer.mp3

falcon1
07-23-2004, 10:49 AM
I ran across this CD a few weeks ago of pieces I never heard from this famous composer. I searched everywhere for the score for one particular piece. I finally found it(once again funny how the CD interpretation is a bit different then whats written!). There are no midi files anywhere of this work. I started the piece in GPO by just inputing the notes in sonar so its rough, however this is onlly a segment. I didnt record certain parts else im afraid it will give it away as to who did this. Its a segment but nearly approaches the end(the end makes a dead give away imo so im leaving it out). happy guessing, well unless you have heard this before!

http://home.cfl.rr.com/delly/GPO%20guess%20the%20composer.mp3

Hi Nicole, is this piece composed for orchestra in mind or is this transscription for orchestra? I have few fellows in mind, but would like to know the answer to the question above first. :)

Nicole
07-23-2004, 10:52 AM
Hi Nicole, is this piece composed for orchestra in mind or is this transscription for orchestra? I have few fellows in mind, but would like to know the answer to the question above first. :)
No hints and only one "fellow" per guess! Sorry Falcon thats all the info im giving. "_" :)

Larry G. Alexander
07-23-2004, 11:43 AM
It sounds a lot like the style of the Mendelssohn string symphonies. (?)

Could it be Felix himself?

Regards,

Larry A.

Karl Garrett
07-23-2004, 12:22 PM
OK Nicole,

I am really terrible at this kind of guessing game, but here ere are my thoughts.

For most of the way through, itŐs a rather nice straightforward fugue. The subject is pretty strong and if the orchestration you did is legit, my guess it was late classical or early romantic period. So the piece is humming along very nicely, then wow!, we hit that diminished 7th arpeggio. OK now someoneŐs having a little fun at the expense of perhaps Beethoven. If I remember Beethoven wrote a lot of counterpoint just for practice. The orchestration near the end, and the way he would sometimes hang on a diminished chord, playing around with it before resolving it, leads me to think that it could almost be him, except for that arpeggio out of the blue. Of course thatŐs the point where youŐre teasing gets cruel, and you quit. :D So my guess is that itŐs P. D. Q. Bach, alias Peter Schickele.

Strike up another bad guess for Karl.

jmc
07-23-2004, 12:34 PM
hmmm...I'm going to guess Tchaikovsky. Although it somehow feels a little "early" for him, I'm going to go with that.

Skysaw
07-23-2004, 12:37 PM
I might have said Felix as well, but Larry beat me to it, so I guess I'll go with Schumann.

RickH
07-23-2004, 12:40 PM
I'm going to say Beethoven, based on 1) the brass and woodwind voicing and 2) the ending chord progression.

R.
==

Nicole
07-23-2004, 12:54 PM
hmmm...I'm going to guess Tchaikovsky. Although it somehow feels a little "early" for him, I'm going to go with that.
You are correct:) Tchaikovsky Suite #1(Orchestra) Opus 43. Draging it to the
end would have been obvious since the typical Tchaikovsky(pedal point, repeated motif over various Harmonies) takes place at the climax in such a way that only sounds Tchaikovskyish and the instruments(mainly brass) become more to the forefront. I was astonished that he wrote such a thing in the first place since he was never hesitant to state his dislike for Bach and Baroque if I remember correctly.

Karl Garrett
07-23-2004, 01:02 PM
I guess that will teach me to stick my nose into something that I know nothing about. :D

Hardy Heern
07-23-2004, 02:28 PM
It was obviously Tchaikovsky or one of those other composers from the olden days.

Frank

Nicole
07-23-2004, 03:03 PM
The giveaway sequence segment near the end I left out that happens soon after I cut it :) Its as far as I got. Just need to finish the last few bars then my favorite word comes into play "tweak" hehe.
http://home.cfl.rr.com/delly/giveaway.mp3

KevinKauai
07-23-2004, 09:45 PM
Very fun quiz, Nicole! I immediately downloaded the MP3 and didn't read any further. I was leaning towards Mendelssohn as well -- which is, in a way, "early Tchaikovsky". Opus 43? I can't find a complete listing of the Opus numbers, but 42 is a collection of violin pieces (inlcuding "Melodie") and all of the ballets are much higher.

There was a recent "Great Performances" video of Michael Tilson-Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony performing the Fourth Symphony (often overlooked in favor of the 5th and 6th) which, I thought, was just riveting. What an amazing life (even if you don't believe everything in the Ken Russell film "The Music Lovers")!

:) KevinKauai

Hardy Heern
07-24-2004, 03:42 AM
With hindsight! at 2:53 it sounds very reminiscent of Tchaikovsky but I don't know if I would have guessed. I'm afraid the 'giveaway' wasn't a 'giveaway' for an ill educated lout like me.

Frank

Skysaw
07-24-2004, 09:36 PM
There was a recent "Great Performances" video of Michael Tilson-Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony performing the Fourth Symphony (often overlooked in favor of the 5th and 6th)

The fourth is my favorite, and is actually also considered somewhat of a "blockbuster." I think the first movement is simply amazing in its construction and development, and also happens to be a fantastic study for anyone who's learning orchestration.

jmc
07-26-2004, 04:34 PM
You are correct:) Tchaikovsky Suite #1(Orchestra) Opus 43.
I won! I won! [spiking Dover score] In yo' face, whoever! I'm going to Disneyland!

I listened to it a couple of times, and just felt the main motive was kind of 1812ish, and when I heard that diminished arpeggio, something about it reminded me of the Nutcracker. I'm not sure where or why, because it has been a while since I have listened to Tchaikovsky. So much great music, out there...