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Garritan
12-13-2003, 11:37 AM
Mozart Clarinet Concerto (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/Clarinet3.mp3\")
Performed by Duncan Brinsmead, Short Excerpt, (2.8 MB), K. 622 (1791)

The Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, is one of the best concertos ever written for the clarinet. Some claim that it is one of the best concertos for any wind instrument. Above is a short excerpt and here (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/mozartClarinetConcerto.mp3\") is the full 7 minute version (10.9 MB).

Personal Orchestra Instrumentation: 2 Flutes, 2 Clarinets, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns, First Violins Section (sustains & shortbows), Second Violin Section (sustains & shortbows), Solo Stradivari Violin, Solo Gagliano Violin, Viola Section (sustains & shortbows), Solo Cello 1, Solo Cello 2 , Cello Section (pizzicato, sustains & shortbows), Solo Double Bass, Double Basses (pizzicato, sustains &

Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/SugarPlum_Fairy.mp3\") - Excerpt from the Nutcracker, 2.6MB

Tchaikovsky was the first to use a celeste in a major wok in the \"Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy\" from the Nutcraker Ballet. Tchaikovsky was captivated by its `divinely beautiful tone\' and few composers have been able to capture the magic achieved by this composer. The delicate sound of the celeste in Personal Orchestra is a celeste made by Mustel. This demo was sequenced and mixed with Cakewalk Sonar.

Personal Orchestra Instrumentation: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 2 trombones, bass trombone, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, glockenspiel, tympani, harp, celesta, and strings.

Organ Symphony (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/organSymphony.mp3\") - Composed by Camille Saint-SaŽns and performed by Duncan Brinsmead - Excerpt, 3MB,

The Organ Symphony is scored for a large orchestra and concert pipe organ and also includes contrabassoon and four piano hands. A great chord on the organ heralds the start of the piece followed by the main theme played first by the strings and tinkling piano before the organ takes over with brass and timpani.

Personal Orchestra Instrumentation: Concert Pipe Organ, Concert Grand Piano (Duo 1 & Duo 2), 3 Flutes, 2 Oboes, English Horn, 2 Clarinets,Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons, Contrabassoon, 4 Horns, 3 Trumpets, 2 Trombones, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Bass Drum, Cymbals, Solo Violin, First Violins Section (sustains & shortbows), Second Violins (sustains & shortbows), Solo Stradivari Violin, Solo Gagliano Violin, Viola Section (sustains & shortbows), Solo Cello, Cello Section (sustains & shortbows), Solo Double Bass, Double Basses (sustains & shortbows).

More classical demos will be posted soon.

Gary Garritan

Dr. Apostrophe X
12-13-2003, 01:03 PM
Link for full version of Clarinet Concerto above seems broke...

this (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/mozartClarinetConcerto.mp3\")

...appears to be the correct link.

Pax.

Garritan
12-13-2003, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by Dr. Apostrophe X:
Link for full version of Clarinet Concerto above seems broke...

this (\"http://www.garritan.com/mp3/mozartClarinetConcerto.mp3\")

...appears to be the correct link.

Pax. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Thanks for bringing this to my attention. The link is now fixed.l

Gary

Aaron Levitz
12-13-2003, 02:10 PM
Ironically (since Gary just now corrected the link to the full version here)... the Clarinet Concerto excerpt works here, but is broken both times it\'s referenced on the official site.

I\'m sure that\'ll be fixed by the time anyone reads this, but I just enjoyed the timing. I\'ve been in similar situations, and this is the point where I\'d usually stop pulling my hair out and start laughing.

JonP
12-13-2003, 02:23 PM
I liked the Sugar Plum Fairy the best. The celeste is really very nice and the whole ensemble blended really nicely although I found the mix a tad woolly. The woodwind in particular were very sensitively handled and had a great deal of character.

The Organ in the Symphony is really weighty and effective but I found the performance rather dragging. I was suprised how well the strings wedded with the organ although I found the brass rather false.

Whatever, its the first set of demos for this library that have impressed me and I think for its price that this is one hell of a library. I think I might buy it for my laptop.

Hardy Heern
12-13-2003, 04:44 PM
Great work with the Mozart concerto Dunking. What a wonderful \'tune\'! images/icons/smile.gif Just one of several dozen favourites of mine. I have to say that your skills and standards are very high indeed.

Who programmed the \'Dance of the Sugar Plug Fairy\'?

Hmmmmm. ....All these secret composers Eh!

Frank

YBaCuO
12-14-2003, 12:42 AM
Well, once again Duncan Brinsmead brought tears of sweet joy to my eyes, this time with his performance of the slow movement from Mozart\'s Clarinet Concerto. The solo part, especially starting from 2:25++, was exquisitely performed with feeling, grace, sensitivity. I could scarcely believe my ears - was this really just a sample-based computer player played back from the keyboard (with a breath-controller, I believe)?

Well, I hope developers listen to what Duncan wrote about earlier - focus more on creating instruments and less on creating huge libraries of articulations. GPO seems to have taken the first step in this direction, because in Duncan\'s hands, GPO seems to be an extraordinarily expressive instrument.

Duncan, please share with us some of your extraordinary technique: what loop-back device did you use?, how easy is it to switch back and forth between legato and non-legato (really so very effective in the solo clarinet line)?, how did you execute the fast notes?, the trills? (also incredible realistic and unbelievable), how did you create a swell at the end of a note but while still avoiding that sucking sound when the next note plays?, in general, how do you \"play\" these parts to avoid this note-to-note sucking sound?, how do you create the smooth swells in the strings (for example around 3:18)?, ...

I am sure I would have a lot more specific questions if I would listen to it again. But I wanted to write while my eyes were dry ...

Thank you Duncan!

YBaCuO

nexus
12-14-2003, 07:22 AM
\"...rather dragging. I was suprised how well the strings wedded with the organ although I found the brass rather false...\"

This is probably because we are used to hearing bloated large brass unisons in other sample libraries, like the one from East-West, though they can work well in a late romantic era piece like the Organ Symphony. For very large scale \'Wagnerian\' works, I will probably use my SAM brass which I now run under Kontakt. I also like the brass in the Edirol HQ Orchestra for some things, especially modern \'filmscore\' type works. But GPO has it for \'classical\' works like the Beethoven and Duncan\'s Mozart demos, and that clarinet soloing...Well done Duncan!!

Haydn
12-14-2003, 08:53 PM
Many were done with standalone sequencers. The package does include Cubasis for sequencing which will get you start. There is also Overture SE which is a notation program.

jean luc de lorme
12-14-2003, 11:59 PM
I see, I\'ll be getting Logic 6 on my MAC G5. I hope these two (GOP and Logic) work out good together! images/icons/smile.gif

J

jean luc de lorme
12-15-2003, 12:44 AM
OK, I have to ask, were these pieces done on GOP by itself (stand alone) or was another sequencer used with GOP? Please do tell! I\'m still on my way to purchasing GOP!

J

J. Whaley
12-15-2003, 01:14 AM
Wow - I can\'t believe it images/icons/smile.gif I\'ve never heard legitimate classical pieces sound so realistic with samples. The winds are extraordinary. Mozart reminded me of one of my favorite pieces! I can\'t tell what it is though images/icons/smile.gif I\'m going to get my copy of GPO, work really hard to be an expert, and then post my mystry piece images/icons/smile.gif

J-

Duncan Brinsmead
12-15-2003, 02:38 PM
Duncan, please share with us some of your extraordinary technique: what loop-back device did you use?, how easy is it to switch back and forth between legato and non-legato (really so very effective in the solo clarinet line)?, how did you execute the fast notes?, the trills? (also incredible realistic and unbelievable), how did you create a swell at the end of a note but while still avoiding that sucking sound when the next note plays?, in general, how do you \"play\" these parts to avoid this note-to-note sucking sound?, how do you create the smooth swells in the strings (for example around 3:18)? <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">The legato is entirely due to the legato tool( using the sustain pedal ). I play with a Yamaha BC3 breath controller which is not sensitive enought to handle note attack speeds, but is good for overall phrasing. The key velocity allows me to handle sharp or light attacks. Sometimes I did not coordinate well the performance of the pedal with the legato points and so would edit the sustain pedal events(cc64) after the fact( using Sonar ). The legato tool is especially important on fast moving lines and trills.

In the Mozart slow moving legato lines were a problem in the strings. In general I would still use the legato tool for this, but would also edit the velocities on the notes to be near zero and overlap the notes substantially. Occasionally I might need to hand edit the breath track to try and smooth transitions, although this is tedious and only partly effective. In general I found the solo strings to work better( in my old beta GPO version ) for slow legato, but only if I didn\'t use the legato tool. Layering solo strings helped smooth things out in some places.

The note to note sucking sound I believe you are referring to is the slow attack on a string sample. Part of what the legato tool does is to avoid the initial attack phase of the samples so there is no drop in sound between notes. However one should have the pedal up for the first notes of slurs to avoid unnatural sounding attacks.

I\'m glad you enjoyed the Mozart.

Duncan

Duncan Brinsmead
12-15-2003, 02:41 PM
Mozart reminded me of one of my favorite pieces! I can\'t tell what it is though <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I\'m going to take a wild stab at this.. the soundtrack to Cinema Paradisio? There are some parts at the end where the sound reminded me a lot of this.

Duncan

J. Whaley
12-15-2003, 06:01 PM
Nope - it\'s a piece most don\'t think of for demos - but it\'s a fantastic piece. GPO will be perfect for it! But I shant tell because as soon as I do someone with more time then me will beat me to the punch images/icons/smile.gif

I have a new product for Gary to create - TIME. Gary\'s done a great job giving us cool samples, but now I need more time to play with them!!!! Can you create a time pill?


(Some people need a pill that will help them play IN TIME - I actually want MORE TIME!!!)


J-

Jake Johnson
12-16-2003, 12:55 AM
Great \"Sugarplum Fairies.\" Makes me want to hear more of The Nutcracker.

(Anyone able to follow the plot, though? Went to see it this weekend--see my other post--and still get lost after the \"Dance of the Sugarplum Fairies\": the boys break the nutcracker, which the girl has assoicated with the older boy she\'s just met, and the magician shrinks her to the size of the nutcracker--thus the tree seems to grow large, and the mice and toy soilders doing battle are as large as she is, and the sugarplum fairies, a kind of candied plum in the shape of fairies--a Christmas treat--come to life and dance. But then we\'re suddenly off to China and see dances from around the world. I\'m lost, and I guess too lazy to do the research to see if scenes are now left out that would have explained it more, or if the story was so well known that the original viewers would have understood the logic.

Great dancers for the Marzipan sequence, this year. (This sequence seems to come back to the dancers as holiday food motif.) The most humorous part of the ballet, for me, and I suspect one of the hardest to dance. Were all the dancers dolls a girl might have recieved as a gift, from different parts of the world? Sorry to reveal the depths of my ignorance...)

Jake Johnson
12-16-2003, 01:07 AM
To answer my own post: this site includes the book by Hoffmann and an introduction by Maurice Sendak, who designed a version of the ballet for the Pacific Northwest Ballet, that explains how the ballet was extracted from the book:

http://users.htcomp.net/weis/nutcrintro.html (\"http://users.htcomp.net/weis/nutcrintro.html\")

(Some Sendak illustrations, too, for the kids.)

Frodo
12-16-2003, 03:01 PM
Gary,

I know the artist who performed the Sugarplum Fairy demo wishes to remain anonymous, but do you think he might reveal what reverb, EQ, etc. he used. It\'s a very nice mix. images/icons/smile.gif

Thanks,

Frodo

Garritan
12-16-2003, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by Frodo:
Gary,

I know the artist who performed the Sugarplum Fairy demo wishes to remain anonymous, but do you think he might reveal what reverb, EQ, etc. he used. It\'s a very nice mix. images/icons/smile.gif

Thanks,

Frodo <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Frodo,

This one was done pretty much \"out-of-the-box\". The Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy was sequenced with Sonar, no EQ was applied, and the reverb used was the bundled Ambience reverb.

This selection was one of the pieces played at seven performances of the Nutcracker by the Northwest Ballet Theatre. More details and Nutcracker demos later.

Gary Garritan

PS No sheep or cute little kittens were harmed in the making of the strings for the two harps in GPO.

Frodo
12-16-2003, 03:34 PM
Gary,

Awesome! So no sound-stage plug-in or anything, huh? Wow! (Regarding your P.S., LOL! images/icons/grin.gif )

Frodo